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I want to find out the majority color in an image file and set it to background of a swing frame. What should I do?

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What kind of image file? Do you know how to read in an image file? –  Lucas Mar 16 '12 at 7:18
    
Any kind of file jpeg, png, gif, or any other. Any example image file you can take. –  Aishwarya Shiva Mar 16 '12 at 7:21
    
How to determine the most frequently used colors in an image file sourceforge.net/projects/jiu/forums/forum/51534/topic/3883065 or daniweb.com/software-development/java/threads/335957 –  ee. Mar 16 '12 at 7:22
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"majority color" The most simplistic implementation of that will often not produce the color the user expects. E.G. a red/orange gradient across a 200x200 image might produce 200 columns of slightly different shades, each color taking up to 200 px of vertical space. But put a solid green square of 20x20 in the center and it will fill 400 px of the image. I doubt anyone would look at that image and identify the dominant color as 'green'. BTW - Please look to increase that (36%) accept rate. –  Andrew Thompson Mar 16 '12 at 7:32

3 Answers 3

You can yourself do this by traversing each pixel in image and then getting color for that. and then increment counter for each color found.

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It all comes down to efficiency. You could literally read every RGB value of the image, and find the Mode, but that would take a long time.

Rather, what I would do is simply split the image into parts, lets say 100 Squares or something. We take the value in the centre of each square, and whichever appears the most is PROBABLY the most common color. Yes, this is sort of risky, because what if the image just happens to have a less used color in ALL the pixels you evaluated. The best thing to do would be to first of all, have a range, so if you get similar rgb's like (0,2,0) and (0,0,0) you simply treat them as the same.

The next thing you should do, is take about 10% of the image as a sample. It's very likely you will get the proper answer. So, if the image is 500px, use 50px as a sample, evenly distributed along the picture.

This is a trade off between accuracy and speed, because checking the whole image would take a very long time, and doesnt make sense.

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you need to extract RGB percentage value from your Image for this some algorithm is there which give RGB value. And you also need to divide your whole image into some parts (example Nine square) and then get the RGB value and by this way you get the color which is more in your Image. May be this will help you.

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