Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am honestly really confused on reading binary files in C#. I have C++ code for reading binary files:

FILE *pFile = fopen(filename, "rb");    
uint n = 1024;
uint readC = 0;
do {
    short* pChunk = new short[n];
    readC = fread(pChunk, sizeof (short), n, pFile);    
} while (readC > 0);

and it reads the following data:

-156, -154, -116, -69, -42, -36, -42, -41, -89, -178, -243, -276, -306,...

I tried convert this code to C# but cannot read such data. Here is code:

using (var reader = new BinaryReader(File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open)))
{
     sbyte[] buffer = new sbyte[1024];                
     for (int i = 0; i < 1024; i++)
     {
         buffer[i] = reader.ReadSByte();
     }                
}

and i get the following data:

100, -1, 102, -1, -116, -1, -69, -1, -42, -1, -36 

How can i get similar data?

share|improve this question
    
In C++, you're reading each entity as a short, which is 2 bytes , whereas in C#, you're reading each entity as an sbyte which is 1 byte. –  Jason Mar 16 '12 at 9:12
    
@Jason surely in C++ the size of short is not fully defined ;p But: I don't disagree. You should add that as an answer. –  Marc Gravell Mar 16 '12 at 9:12
    
I wouldn't know, no C++ experience ;/ –  Jason Mar 16 '12 at 9:13
    
In the C++ example you're reading short data types, while in the C# example you're using a signed byte, the data range is much smaller. Have you tried changing sbyte to short in the C# example? –  Keith Halligan Mar 16 '12 at 9:13
    
Indeed, -178, -243, -306, etc are completely outside the sbyte range - so that is never going to work as sbyte –  Marc Gravell Mar 16 '12 at 9:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A short is not a signed byte, it's a signed 16 bit value.

 short[] buffer = new short[1024];                
 for (int i = 0; i < 1024; i++) {
     buffer[i] = reader.ReadInt16();
 }
share|improve this answer

You should use the same data type to get the correct output or cast to a new type.

In c++ you are using short. (i suppose the file is also written with short) so use short itself in c#. or you can use Sytem.Int16.

You are getting different values because short and sbyte are not equivalent. short is 2 bytes and Sbyte is 1 byte

using (var reader = new BinaryReader(File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open)))
{
     System.Int16[] buffer = new System.Int16[1024];                
     for (int i = 0; i < 1024; i++)
     {
         buffer[i] = reader.ReadInt16();
     }                
}
share|improve this answer

Your C++ code reads 2 bytes at a time (you're using sizeof(short)), while your C# code reads one byte at a time. A SByte (see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d86he86x(v=vs.71).aspx) uses 8 bits of storage.

share|improve this answer

That's because in C++ you're reading shorts and in C# you're reading signed bytes (that's why SByte means). You should use reader.ReadInt16()

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.