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Query :

    SELECT
        r.reply_id,
        r.msg_id,
        r.uid,
        r.body,
        r.date,
        u.username as username,
        u.profile_picture as profile_picture
    FROM
        pm_replies as r
        LEFT JOIN users as u
            ON u.uid = r.uid
    WHERE
        r.msg_id = '784351921943772258'

    ORDER BY r.date DESC

i tried all index combinations i could think of, searched in google how best i could index this but nothing worked.

this query takes 0,33 on 500 returned items and counting...


EXPLAIN:

id  select_type     table   type    possible_keys   key     key_len     ref     rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  r   ALL     index1  NULL    NULL    NULL    540     Using where; Using filesort
1   SIMPLE  u   eq_ref  uid     uid     8   site.r.uid  1   

SHOW CREATE pm_replies

CREATE TABLE `pm_replies` (
 `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `reply_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
 `msg_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
 `uid` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
 `body` text COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
 `date` datetime NOT NULL,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
 KEY `index1` (`msg_id`,`date`,`uid`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=541 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

SHOW CREATE users

CREATE TABLE `users` (
 `id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `uid` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
 `username` varchar(20) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
 `email` text CHARACTER SET latin1 NOT NULL,
 `password` text CHARACTER SET latin1 NOT NULL,
 `profile_picture` text COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
 `date_registered` datetime NOT NULL,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
 UNIQUE KEY `uid` (`uid`),
 UNIQUE KEY `username` (`username`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM AUTO_INCREMENT=2004 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci
share|improve this question
    
Can you add the output of SHOW CREATE TABLE pm_replies, SHOW CREATE TABLE users, EXPLAIN SELECT <your entire select here>? Other than that, probable index will be r.msg_id, r.uid and you'll want u.uid to have an index too (best unique). –  Konerak Mar 16 '12 at 9:40
    
@Konerak updated question –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 9:46
    
do you have indexed u.uid, r.uid, r.msg_id and r.date? EDIT: I see... Try to index date in pm_replies –  Uriel_SVK Mar 16 '12 at 9:46
    
@Uriel_SVK thats correct –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 9:47
    
@fx-user - You need composite/covering indexes. One index that covers multiple fields. With KEY IndexN (msg_id, date) you get all records sorted by date for the same msg_id. So when you pick one msg_id, they're all pre-sorted by date for you. See my answer below. –  MatBailie Mar 16 '12 at 9:56

5 Answers 5

For the query as it is, the best indexes would seem to be...

pm_replies: (msg_id, date, uid)
users:      (uid)

The important one is pm_replies. You use it to both filter your data (the filter column is first) then order your data (the order column is second).

The would be different if you removed the filter. Then you'd just want (date, uid) as your index.

The last field in the index just makes it a fraction friendlier to the join, the important part is actually the index on users.

There is a lot more that coudl be said on this, a whole chapter in a book at the very least, and several books if your wanted to. But I hope this helps.


EDIT

Not that my suggested index for pm_replies is one index covering three fields, and not just three indexes. This ensures that all the entries in the index are pre-sorted by those columns. It's like sorting data in Excel by three columns.

Having three separate indexes is like having the Excel data on three tabs. Each sorted by a different fields.

Only whith one index over three fields do you get this behaviour...
- You can select one 'bunch' of records with the same msg_id
- That whole 'bunch' are next to each other, no gaps, etc
- That whole 'bunch' are sorted in date order for that msg_id
- For any rows with the same date, they're ordered by user_id

(Again the user_id part is really very minor.)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, the date is the key here I think. –  davidethell Mar 16 '12 at 9:55
    
so you are saying to create 1 index with 3 columns?if so this still doesnt seem to help. –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 9:59
    
updated EXPLAIN and SHOW CREATE TABLE for replies –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 10:06
    
@fxuser - Unless it's a MyISAM strangeness, I'm not sure. How many records actually exist in your table? Also, could you try creating the index separately? CREATE INDEX ix_pm_replies_2 ON pm_replies (msg_id, date, user_id) –  MatBailie Mar 16 '12 at 10:14
    
@dems there are about 540 records in the table and i pull them all without LIMITing the query. A solution could be to add limit even if i would not want to do that. i added your index which is the same with mine but doesnt seem to work either. –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 10:17

Please try this:

SELECT
        r.reply_id,
        r.msg_id,
        r.uid,
        r.body,
        r.date,
        u.username as username,
        u.profile_picture as profile_picture
    FROM
        pm_replies as r
        LEFT JOIN users as u
            ON (u.uid = r.uid AND r.msg_id = '784351921943772258')
    ORDER BY r.date DESC

in my case it help.

share|improve this answer
    
same loading time. –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 9:43
1  
That is functionally different, and most likely incorrect. The OP takes a specific set of rows from pm_replies, based on msg_id, and then left joins them to users. (Possibly just one row.) You take all rows from pm_replies but only join them to users for a specific msg_id, all the others still come through, but as NULLs. This is not an answer. –  MatBailie Mar 16 '12 at 9:43
    
did you index fields r.msg_id and r.date? –  Miro Mar 16 '12 at 9:44
    
@Miro yeah both columns are indexed –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 9:48

Add date to your index1 key so that msg_id and date are both in the index.

share|improve this answer
    
still nothing seem to change –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 9:56

What Dems is saying should be correct, but there is one additional detail if you are using InnoDB: perhaps you are paying the price of secondary indexes on clustered tables - essentially, accessing a row through the secondary index requires additional lookup trough the primary, i.e. clustering index. This "double lookup" might make the index less attractive to the query optimizer.

To alleviate this, try covering the all the fields in your select statement with the index:

pm_replies: (msg_id, date, uid, reply_id, body, date)
users:      (uid, username, profile_picture)
share|improve this answer
    
all my tables are myisam, i changed to innodb just to test dems comment. –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 11:34
    
@fxuser One more thing: have you tried using index pm_replies: (msg_id, uid), since this is a LEFT join and users is the "outer" table. Also, did you try removing LEFT, just to see what happens? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Mar 16 '12 at 12:18
    
@fxuser Or even pm_replies: (uid, msg_id)? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Mar 16 '12 at 12:28
    
tried adding a 2 column index and either ways didnt help either... still using filesort and loading times are the same... even when i removed left join. –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 12:38

It appears the optimizer is trying to force the index by ID to make the join to the user table. Since you are doing a left-join (which doesn't make sense since I would expect every entry to have a user ID, thus a normal INNER JOIN), I'll keep it left join.

So, I would try the following. Query just the replies based on the MESSAGE ID and order by the date descending on its own merits, THEN left join, such as

SELECT
        r.reply_id,
        r.msg_id,
        r.uid,
        r.body,
        r.date,
        u.username as username,
        u.profile_picture as profile_picture
    FROM
        ( select R2.* 
             from pm_replies R2
             where r2.msg_id = '784351921943772258' ) r
        LEFT JOIN users as u
            ON u.uid = r.uid
    ORDER BY
        r.date DESC

In addition, since I don't have MySQL readily available, and can't remember if order by is allowed in a sub-query, if so, you can optimize the inner prequery (using alias "R2") and put the order by there, so it uses the (msgid, date) index and returns just that set... THEN joins to user table on the ID which no index is required at that point from the SOURCE result set, just the index on the user table to find the match.

share|improve this answer
    
this takes even longer to load and adding 1 index on 2 columns(msg_id, date) wont work either. –  fxuser Mar 16 '12 at 13:34
    
@fxuser, sorry it didn't work, but you always have to try alternatives from what the engine may be thinking. It was a simple test and either worked faster or not. Just one of many approaches to look for performance improvements. –  DRapp Mar 16 '12 at 13:43

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