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We have to store approximately 13 million files and perform some standard operations on the files. We are using Windows. The first question is can we store it on the filesystem? The total file size would be about 6000 TB. I am checking gridfs on MongoDB. I don't know if this is a good approach. We will be using Java at the serverside.
If it can store these files comfortably, what would be the performance for fetching the file and serving it to the user and operations like file rename, metadata update etc.
We also need to backup all the files to a secondary filesystem storage later. But the files in gridfs would be stored in chunks. So the question is how can we quickly get all those files and send it to secondary filesystem.
Please let me know the approach I should take.

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@JeffFoster, still not sure what path to follow. Looking into some high performing filesystems, Ceph, Lustre etc. I don't know much about filesystems. Is gridfs a better option...? –  Vish Mar 16 '12 at 9:46
    
@Vish As written by Jeff, this is something for pro... And not for "normal" pro probably... For pro pro :-) –  xanatos Mar 16 '12 at 9:51
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

MongoDB is web scale, so it should be fine

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How does the backup of all the files stored in gridfs to a secondary filesystem storage work, can it be done easily? –  Vish Mar 16 '12 at 11:00
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Obligatory NSFW post: youtube.com/watch?v=b2F-DItXtZs. Also, backup of GridFS to another filesystem is not very intuitive and, if you are storing files on Windows, retrieving them from your GridFS database will render them unreadable by a lot of MS applications like Word, Excel, Photoviewer. If you're on Linux you should be fine. –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jun 22 '12 at 13:35
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