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I have a function that checks each cell in each row of a table for the edit-error class. If this is found in any cell of a particular row (The cell value hasn't passed through validation) then I remove the edit-submit class from the entire row and unselect a checkbox which is in the first td of that row.

When there are a large number of rows (1,000+) I am struggling with performance so I thought I could try for loops but I am not an expert in JavaScript so am looking for help with this.

The original code is as follows:

var checkErrors = function () {
    $('#results tr:not(:first)').each(function () {
        $('td:first input:checkbox', $(this)).attr('checked', 'checked');
        $(this).addClass('edit-submit');

        $(this).find('td').each(function () {
            if ($(this).hasClass('edit-error')) {
                $('td:first input:checkbox', $(this).parent('tr')).removeAttr('checked');
                $(this).parent().removeClass('edit-submit');
            }
        });
    });
}

The table has an id of #results. What I do first is check all the checkboxes and add the edit-submit class to each row then loop through all the cells checking for errors.

I am looking for any help with performance improvements on this function please.

EDIT

It would have made sense to add the table html. Apologies for that here it is:

<table id="results">
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <th>&nbsp;</th>
            <th>Policy Number</th>
            <th>Quota Code</th>
            <th>Contract Date</th>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td><input type="checkbox"></td>
            <td class="edit-error">ABC123%</td>
            <td>123</td>
            <td class="edit-error">99/99/9999</td>
        </tr>
        <tr class="edit-submit">
            <td><input type="checkbox" checked="checked"></td>
            <td>ABC123</td>
            <td>123</td>
            <td>16/03/2012</td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

This would show on the page:

--------------------------------------------------
|   | Policy Number | Quota Code | Contract Date |
--------------------------------------------------
|   | ABC123%       | 123        | 99/99/9999    |
--------------------------------------------------
| X | ABC123        | 123        | 16/03/2012    |
--------------------------------------------------
share|improve this question
    
:first is non-standard CSS which means jQuery can't use the (fast) native selector available. Try removing the :first and use .eq(0) instead (and :not(:first) -> .slice(1)). –  pimvdb Mar 16 '12 at 10:11
    
I am still wondering if using a for loop would be faster than the jQuery .each() function. Would anyone agree with me on that or is using .each() the way to go? –  Ian Roke Mar 16 '12 at 10:42
1  
Yes, a plain for loop will definitely be faster than .each(). I've included one way to do that in my answer. But there are quite a few other things in your code that can be made more efficient so I'd leave optimisation of the loop itself for last. –  nnnnnn Mar 16 '12 at 10:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are several ways to speed up your code without going to a plain JS for loop. To name just a few:

  • You already have a reference to the current row within the outer .each() loop so use that rather than calling $(this).parent() within the inner loop.
  • If you want to process just the td elements that have a particular class you can include the class in your selector rather than calling .hasClass().
  • Avoid calling the same selector more than once, by storing a reference to the returned jQuery object and/or by chaining.
  • When providing a context as the second parameter to $() you can pass a DOM element or this directly, no need to wrap it in another $() call.
  • If you know that there will always be a checkbox you can uncheck it directly to save a function call.

So:

var checkErrors = function () {
    $('#results tr:not(:first)').each(function () {
        var $tr = $(this),
            cb = $('td:first input:checkbox', this)[0];

        cb.checked = true;

        $tr.addClass('edit-submit')
           .find('td.edit-error').each(function () {
                cb.checked = false;
                $tr.removeClass('edit-submit');
           });
    });
};

However, the inner loop on the tds isn't needed at all since you just need to test whether there are any tds in the row with the error class - you don't need to actually loop through them all. Plus for good measure here's one way to use a for loop rather than .each() - note that you can avoid the complicate not-first selector if you simply select all rows then loop from the second onwards:

var checkErrors = function () {
    var $rows = $('#results tr'),
        i;
    for (i = 1; i < $rows.length; i++) {
        var $tr = $rows.eq(i),
            cb = $tr.find('td:first input:checkbox')[0];

        if ($tr.find('td.edit-error').length === 0) {
           cb.checked = true;
           $tr.addClass('edit-submit');
        } else {
           cb.checked = false;
           $tr.removeClass('edit-submit');
        };
    }
};
share|improve this answer

Try setting a variable for $(this). Also do you need to use find('td')? Would $('td',this) do the same thing but more efficiently?

share|improve this answer

Try this:

   $.each($('#results .edit-error').parent(),function(){
            $(this).removeClass('edit-submit').find('td:first-child input:checkbox').removeAttr('checked');
});
share|improve this answer

Use a variable for $(this).

Your selectors can be improved too : instead of $('#this', '#that'), use $('#that').find('#this')

Here is an improved version with these optimizations.

var checkErrorsOptimized = function () {

    $('#results tr:not(:first)').each(function () {
        var $this = $(this);       

        $this.find('td:first input:checkbox').attr('checked', 'checked');
        $this.addClass('edit-submit');

        $this.find('td').each(function () {
            var $that = $(this);
            if ($that.hasClass('edit-error')) {
                $that.parent('tr').find('td:first input:checkbox').removeAttr('checked');
                $that.parent().removeClass('edit-submit');
            }
        });
    });
}

You can see it on this jsFiddle (using Firebug profiling) : http://jsfiddle.net/5kBsU/3/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks rohk could you explain why doing $('#that').find('#this') is better than $('#this', '#that') please? I always thought it was better to define the scope in the selector. –  Ian Roke Mar 16 '12 at 14:11
1  
shichuan.github.com/javascript-patterns (under jQuery Patterns section => context and find - use find over context) –  Romain Meresse Mar 16 '12 at 14:37
    
Thanks for the link that generally has been an interesting read. I've bookmarked it to learn from. –  Ian Roke Mar 16 '12 at 15:20

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