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Now I am read the book Inside The C++ Object Model 's fourth section and have some question.

An inline function like this:

inline int max(int a, int b)
{
    return (a > b) ? a : b;
}

Then, a statement such as the following: a = max(x, y);

this statement will transformed to a = (x > y) ? x : y;

But the book say when add a local variables to the inline function like this:

inline int max(int a, int b)
{
    int maxval = (a > b) ? a : b;
    return maxval;
}

It will transformed to

int __max_lv_maxval;
a = (__max_lv_maxval = (x > y) ? x : y), __max_lv_maxval;

And obvious the function's performance will drop.

My question is Does the compile (such as VC2010,gcc) optimize the inline function and delete the local variables?

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8  
You make an unfounded assumption here: And obvious the function's performance will drop –  Paul R Mar 16 '12 at 11:40
3  
Why is it "obvious" that performance would drop? C++ is a language with defined behaviour, not a guaranteed set of machine instructions. You should read another book, "Inside a good C++ compiler". –  Kerrek SB Mar 16 '12 at 11:42
3  
What those two said, plus the notion that it's complete folly to try to rationalise about this stuff. Just do your own job -- writing C++ code -- and let the compiler get on with its job. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 16 '12 at 12:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That book seems to be assuming the compiler inlines at a source level, this of course totally depends on the compiler. Most will begin inlining at the AST level, where transforms and certain optimizations can and will occur. This all assumes the compiler will inline the code.

If we look at your function, any decent compiler will turn them both into the same IR code, as it will compile the inline function before it is inlined, thus a temporary is required regardless (at IR level). when the IR is then actually inlined, the temporary will be folded away and instead replaced with the assignment destination of the call to max.

When we compile down to machine code, things can change even more, not only can temporaries be removed, but the destination will most likely be a register (in this case), which will have probably been used for on of the source operands as well.

Bottom Line: This totally depends on your compiler, optimization levels and how it does variable livelyness analysis, value propagation and folding.

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inline int max(int a, int b)
{
    return (a > b) ? a : b;
}

Then, a statement such as the following: a = max(x, y);

this statement will transformed to a = (x > y) ? x : y;

It's not that simple. inline is a hint, not a requirement. The keyword does change the rules slightly, but does not force inlining. You're also forgetting that a and b are also local variables to the max function, and the same book that assumes local variables cannot be optimized away assumes those local variables can be optimized away. They may be optimised away in those cases where it is safe to do so, or they might not be, depending on the compiler and compiler options. For running in a debugger, it may make more sense to keep them. They may not be optimised away when it is unsafe to do so, for example when x and y are volatile. In that case, (x > y) ? x : y reads one of them twice, which is a potentially visible, and therefore invalid, change in behaviour.

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"Slightly". It completely changes the linkage of the function. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 16 '12 at 12:14
2  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I'm under the impression that max still has external linkage in the above example, exactly as without the inline keyword, and that the big change is that all translation units using the function must provide the same definition. (In C, extern inline and plain inline are not the same thing.) –  hvd Mar 16 '12 at 12:21
    
Yes, you're right actually ;) ([C++11: 7.1.2/4]) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 16 '12 at 12:30

Any interesting transformations we can do to the code, the compiler can do as well. And then some!

When the compiler can see that

inline int max(int a, int b) 
{
     return (a > b) ? a : b; 
} 

a = max(x, y);

can be transformed into

 a = (x > y) ? x : y;

It can also easily see that storing a value into a variable that is never used later, is meaningless. The store (and the variable) can be removed without changing the result of the program.

Local variables in small functions are often held in the CPU registers, and never stored in memory at all.

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1  
FWIW: It's not impossible that the compiler implicitly "defines" a local variable for each intermediate value, whether you write one or not. And decides afterwards which local variables go into registers. (This technique is particularly common for the ternary operator.) –  James Kanze Mar 16 '12 at 12:23

The compiler just do as you have show. if we call this inline fun like this

void example()
{
  int m = max(10, 11);
}

the expansion will be

{
  int __max_lv_maxval;// mangled inline local variable  
 int m = (__max_lv_maxval = (x > y) ? x : y), __max_lv_maxval;
}

In general, each local variable within the inline function must be introduced into the enclosing block of the call as a uniquely named variable. The GCC won't do more for you.

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1  
I don't see how this answers the question. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 16 '12 at 11:51
3  
The language doesn't require the inline keyword to force inlining, it doesn't require the local variables to have unique names (if they continue to have names at all), and GCC will certainly do plenty more for you. –  hvd Mar 16 '12 at 11:56
    
@hvd if the inline function expanded for multiple times , each expansion is likely to use its own local vars, the name will be like __max_lv_maxval_00, __max_lv_maxval01 –  Eric.Q Mar 16 '12 at 12:02
    
@stuser974349 Consider { { int a = 3; } { int a = 4; } } -- two different variables in the same function with the same name. –  hvd Mar 16 '12 at 12:12

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