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For some reason I'm having some serious difficulty wrapping my mind around this problem. I need this JS function that accepts 2 arrays, compares the 2, and then returns a string of the missing element. E.g. Find the element that is missing in the currentArray that was there in the previous array.

function findDeselectedItem(CurrentArray, PreviousArray){

var CurrentArrSize = CurrentArray.length;
var PrevousArrSize = PreviousArray.length;

// Then my brain gives up on me...
// I assume you have to use for-loops, but how do you compare them??

return missingElement;

}

Thank in advance! I'm not asking for code, but even just a push in the right direction or a hint might help...

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1  
You need to compare each element of array A to each element of array B. There a ways to speed up the process though if you know which kind of values you are comparing. –  Felix Kling Mar 16 '12 at 12:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should work. You should also consider the case where the elements of the arrays are actually arrays too. The indexOf might not work as expected then.

function findDeselectedItem(CurrentArray, PreviousArray) {

   var CurrentArrSize = CurrentArray.length;
   var PreviousArrSize = PreviousArray.length;

   // loop through previous array
   for(var j = 0; j < PreviousArrSize; j++) {

      // look for same thing in new array
      if (CurrentArray.indexOf(PreviousArray[j]) == -1)
         return PreviousArray[j];

   }

   return null;

}
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Take a look at underscore difference function: http://documentcloud.github.com/underscore/#difference

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Wow that's great, what does it return though? An array or a single string variable? –  Relborg Mar 16 '12 at 12:06
    
@DeanGrobler: => [1, 3, 4] looks like an array. Why would you want a string? You can convert an array to a string easily anyways. –  Felix Kling Mar 16 '12 at 12:07
    
@Felix Kling - That sounds right yes, just wanted to make sure. Thanks :-) –  Relborg Mar 16 '12 at 12:09
    
It returns an array. If you've got only one missing element you probably want to use it _.difference(CurrentArray,PreviousArray)[0]. P.S. underscore is a great library. I use it in almost every project. Give it a try. –  welldan97 Mar 16 '12 at 12:10

I know this is code but try to see the difference examples to understand the way:

var current = [1, 2, 3, 4],
    prev = [1, 2, 4],
    isMatch = false,
    missing = null;

var i = 0, y = 0,
    lenC = current.length,
    lenP = prev.length;

for ( ; i < lenC; i++ ) {
    isMatch = false;
    for ( y = 0; y < lenP; y++ ) {
        if (current[i] == prev[y]) isMatch = true;
    }
    if ( !isMatch ) missing = current[i]; // Current[i] isn't in prev
}

alert(missing);

Or using ECMAScript 5 indexOf:

var current = [1, 2, 3, 4],
    prev = [1, 2, 4],
    missing = null;

var i = 0,
    lenC = current.length;

for ( ; i < lenC; i++ ) {
    if ( prev.indexOf(current[i]) == -1 ) missing = current[i]; // Current[i] isn't in prev
}

alert(missing);

And with while

var current = [1, 2, 3, 4],
    prev = [1, 2, 4],
    missing = null,
    i = current.length;

while(i) {
    missing = ( ~prev.indexOf(current[--i]) ) ? missing : current[i];
}

alert(missing);
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previousArray.filter(function(x) {
    return currentArray.indexOf(x)!=-1
})

(Can be made more efficient if necessary, by creating a temporary object out of currentArray, and using it as a hashtable for O(1) queries. For example:)

var current={}; currentArray.forEach(function(x){ current[x]=true });

Then it becomes even simpler:

previousArray.filter(function(x) {
    return current[x]
})
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1  
This is a fabulous answer; gotta love functional programming. Some more work is needed to get it working in non JS1.6 browsers though. Luckily Mozilla has done that work for us in the compatibility sections here: indexOf and here: filter –  Hemlock Mar 16 '12 at 12:27

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