Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
Distance distance(const vector<long> &x, const vector <short> &y)
{
    Distance total = 0.0;
    Distance diff;

    vector <long >::const_iterator cpx=x.begin(); //terminates at this line

    vector <short>::const_iterator cpy=y.begin();
    vector <long>::const_iterator cpx_end=x.end();
    for(;cpx!=cpx_end;++cpx,++cpy){
        diff = *cpx - *cpy;
        total += (diff * diff);
    }
    return total;
}

distance is long long int.

my code terminates when i try to assign the const iterator with begin of vector? why is this happening? vectors are initialized with zero.

share|improve this question
3  
Please provide the code (minimally) that calls this function aswell as any error message you get when the program terminates. Have you debugged in to this? –  Moo-Juice Mar 16 '12 at 12:02
2  
If you mean "memset(&vec, 0, sizeof(vec))" with "vectors initialized with zero", then that's your problem. –  stefaanv Mar 16 '12 at 12:37
    
@KerrekSB dont mind but are you blind cant you see cpx and cpy are iterators declared and assigned in the same line of code.. –  shobi Mar 16 '12 at 13:16
    
@shobi: Very true, apologies! –  Kerrek SB Mar 16 '12 at 14:28
    
@KerrekSB its ok, sometimes it happens to every one, and sorry for my rude comment... :) –  shobi Mar 16 '12 at 14:50
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is nothing invalid in your code per se. Apparently x vector was somehow damaged before you call distance, either it's lifetime was over or you've got memory corrpution or some other UB. E.g. anything like this:


vector<long> &getData()
{
  vector<long> data;
  // fill data
  return data;
}

// ...

distance(getData(), y);


vector<long> *data = new vector<long>();
// fill data

delete data;

distance(*data, y);


long data[n] = ...;
vector<long> x(n);
memcpy(&x, data, sizeof(data) / sizeof(data[0]));


vector<long> *data = 0;

distance(*data, y);

And there could be much more other cases, anyhow, the solution is to check where x comes from and where it is destroyed or becomes invalid.

share|improve this answer
add comment
  #include <vector>
  #include <iostream>
  #include <stdlib.h>

  #define Distance long long int

  using namespace std;
  Distance distance(const vector<long> &x, const vector <short> &y)
  {
   Distance total = 0.0;
   Distance diff;

   vector <long >::const_iterator cpx=x.begin(); //terminates at this line

   vector <short>::const_iterator cpy=y.begin();
   vector <long>::const_iterator cpx_end=x.end();
   for(;cpx!=cpx_end;++cpx,++cpy){
      diff = *cpx - *cpy;
      total += (diff * diff);
  }
   return total;
 }


int main(){
vector<long> a;
vector<short> b;
    for (int i = 0 ; i<100; ++i){
          a.push_back(0); 
          b.push_back(0);
   }
    distance(a,b);
}

working under linux fine.

please, add your errors and your additional code

share|improve this answer
    
This should have been a comment –  KillianDS Mar 16 '12 at 13:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.