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We have a very odd problem, the below code is working fine on all developers machine/ our 2 test servers, both with code and with built version, however when it is running on a virtual machine with windows 2003 server and asp.net v2.0 it throws an error

Cannot access a closed stream.

public String convertResultToXML(CResultObject[] state)
{
    MemoryStream stream = null;
    TextWriter writer = null;
    try
    {
        stream = new MemoryStream(); // read xml in memory
        writer = new StreamWriter(stream, Encoding.Unicode);
        // get serialise object
        XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(CResultObject[]));
        serializer.Serialize(writer, state); // read object
        int count = (int)stream.Length; // saves object in memory stream
        byte[] arr = new byte[count];
        stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        // copy stream contents in byte array
        stream.Read(arr, 0, count);
        UnicodeEncoding utf = new UnicodeEncoding(); // convert byte array to string
        return utf.GetString(arr).Trim();
    }
    catch
    {
        return string.Empty;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (stream != null) stream.Close();
        if (writer != null) writer.Close();
    }
}

Any idea why would it do this?

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2  
What line does it do this on ? –  Micah Armantrout Mar 16 '12 at 13:16
4  
This is a great reason to use using. –  Moo-Juice Mar 16 '12 at 13:17
    
@Moo-Juice the using is just converted to try-finally –  Aristos Mar 16 '12 at 13:18
    
@Aristos, correct - but then they should be closed/disposed in the correct order. –  Moo-Juice Mar 16 '12 at 13:19
    
It's not an answer but absorbing exception and not using nested using doesn't make your code fine –  Denis Agarev Mar 16 '12 at 13:19

2 Answers 2

For your Serialize use using to prevent the stream remain open.

Something like this:

using (StreamWriter streamWriter = new StreamWriter(fullFilePath))
{
     xmlSerializer.Serialize(streamWriter, toSerialize);
}
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I originally thought that it was because you're closing the stream then closing the writer - you should just close the writer, because it will close the stream also : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.streamwriter.close(v=vs.80).aspx.

However, despite MSDNs protestation, I can't see any evidence that it does actually does this when reflecting the code.

Looking at your code, though, I can't see why you're using the writer in the first place. I'll bet if you change your code thus (I've taken out the bad exception swallowing too) it'll be alright:

public String convertResultToXML(CResultObject[] state) 
{ 
  using(var stream = new MemoryStream)    
  { 
     // get serialise object 
    XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(CResultObject[])); 
    serializer.Serialize(stream, state); // read object 
    int count = (int)stream.Length; // saves object in memory stream 
    byte[] arr = new byte[count]; 
    stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin); 
    // copy stream contents in byte array 
    stream.Read(arr, 0, count); 
    UnicodeEncoding utf = new UnicodeEncoding(); // convert byte array to string 
    return utf.GetString(arr).Trim(); 
  } 
} 

Now you're working with the stream directly, and it'll only get closed once - most definitely getting rid of this strange error - which I'll wager could be something to do with a service pack or something like that.

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