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1.I have some infinte loops how can i get the lowest cpu consumption ? Should i use a delay ?

2.If I have multiple threads running in my application and one of them is THREAD_PRIORITY_IDLE does it affect other threads ?

My code is as this for every thread

procedure TMatchLanLon.Execute;
begin
 while not Terminated do
  begin
          //some code
          Sleep(1000);
  end;
end;
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Add your Delphi version, please. It's important for thread related questions. –  TLama Mar 16 '12 at 13:21
    
@TLama my delphi version is XE2 –  opc0de Mar 16 '12 at 13:22
1  
Duplicate of your own question? –  Andriy M Mar 16 '12 at 13:24
    
This question is better than the last one because the last one was focused around "low priority". –  Warren P Mar 16 '12 at 15:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Typically a thread should sleep until signalled, but not using Sleep or SleepEx.

You create an Event and Wait for it to be signalled,either using TEvent or direct to Win32 API with WaitForSingleObject.

Sleep causes so many problems, including what I call "Sleeping beauty" disease. THe whole rest of your application has terminated and shut down a few hundred microseconds ago, and your thread has slept for a "million years" in relative computer timing terms, and when it wakes up the rest of your application has long since terminated. The next thing your background thread is likely to do is access some object which it has a reference to, which was frozen, and then (if you're lucky) it will crash. Don't use Sleep in threads. Wait for events, or use some pre-built worker thread (like the OmniThreadLibrary one).

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4  
If your thread is executing code (other than sleep), it may still do so after the application is terminated. A simple loop or a complex operation may also take seconds during which there is no interaction with the rest of the application. So sleep is not bad in that sense. If your thread crashes after a sleep, it may also crash after (or during) another operation. No saying that using sleep in a thread is good, but the reason you describe isn't either. –  GolezTrol Mar 16 '12 at 13:35
4  
Windows stops all threads on application exit before deallocating any resources. Sleep() is just fine in threads - I've been using it, (for its proper purposes, not as a polling crutch in a comms-challenged application), for decades. –  Martin James Mar 16 '12 at 13:40
    
'If your thread is executing code (other than sleep), it may still do so after the application is terminated' - no, it cannot. All threads either have their state set so that they are never run again or, if running on a different core than the one that exited, have their processor interrupted to stop them. When all threads have stopped, resources are deallocated. –  Martin James Mar 16 '12 at 13:47
    
There is one scenarion I can think of where sleep() might cause a problem on shutdown - if a sleeping thread wakes up and attempts a direct write to a form, (or component thereon), that has already been freed, then an AV is possible, (then again, the app is closing anyway, so just dump the exception:). Not doing such nasty things as writing to forms helps a lot! –  Martin James Mar 16 '12 at 13:55
    
@GolezTrol - +1 for your logic. No thread can run on after an app has terminated. Sleeping, running, waiting - the threads are all stopped before releasing memory, handles etc. I can't fault your logic though - 'if sleep() is a problem then other threads that are running should be a problem too'. –  Martin James Mar 16 '12 at 14:02

I have some infinte loops how can i get the lowest cpu consumption ?

By blocking the loop until there is something to do.

If I have multiple threads running in my application and one of them is THREAD_PRIORITY_IDLE does it affect other threads ?

..depends . Probably not, but if any other threads are waiting on output from this thread, or the release of a lock from it, then the other threads are effectively 'dragged down' to THREAD_PRIORITY_IDLE as well.
Apart from this priority-inversion, (which can cause deadlocks when threads have several priority levels), spinlocks, a synchronization construct that is normally only bad, can become disastrous.

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