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For example, if I have an array like this:

[:open, 1, :open, 2, 3, :close, 4, :close, :open, 5, :close]

I want to get this:

[[1, [2, 3], 4], [5]]

The :open effectively becomes [ and :close becomes ]

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What code have you tried so far? – GetSet Mar 16 '12 at 13:47
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You could probably do this with a stack, but it's pretty easy to design recursively:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

x = [:open, 1, :open, 2, 3, :close, 4, :close, :open, 5, :close]

def parse(list)
  result = []
  while list.any?
    case (item = list.shift)
    when :open
      result.push(parse(list))
    when :close
      return result
    else
      result.push(item)
    end
  end

  return result
end

puts parse(x).inspect

Note that this will destroy your original array. You should clone it before passing it in if you want to preserve it.

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5  
nice solution, ) – Said Kaldybaev Mar 16 '12 at 14:00
1  
nice and elegant Solution! – suvankar Mar 16 '12 at 14:28
2  
I didn't know that you can use any? as negation of empty?. That's cool. – sawa Mar 16 '12 at 15:09
2  
After seeing this, I was replacing all my not x.empty?, !x.empty?, unless x.empty? into x.any? or if x.any?, but then I realized that I have to be careful not to do this to String as it is not defined for String. – sawa Mar 16 '12 at 15:34
2  
By using recursion you are using an (implicit) stack :) – Andrew Marshall Mar 16 '12 at 16:11
ar = [:open, 1, :open, 2, 3, :close, 4, :close, :open, 5, :close]
p eval(ar.inspect.gsub!(':open,', '[').gsub!(', :close', ']'))
#=> [[1, [2, 3], 4], [5]]
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lol, I've just wanted to post this hack solution :) – fl00r Mar 16 '12 at 14:10
    
I could suggest to use /,\s+:close/. And in ruby 1.9 you can use to_s instead of inspect – fl00r Mar 16 '12 at 14:12
    
This is a lot less generic because it only works well for arrays of literals. Also, you don't need to replace the , before :close: .gsub!(':close', ']') should be sufficient. – Niklas B. Mar 16 '12 at 14:16

The same to steenslag, but a little cleaner

a = [:open, 1, :open, 2, 3, :close, 4, :close, :open, 5, :close]
eval(a.to_s.gsub(':open,','[').gsub(', :close',']'))
#=> [[1, [2, 3], 4], [5]]
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