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I would like to create a Javascript object, let's name it 'geoloc' and place it inside a Javascript library I have created.

This object will use the html5 geolocation API to store the position.coords.latitude and position.coords.longitude values of the user's location into two object properties, let's name them geoloc.latitude and geoloc.longitude.

Then I can use them inside my html code like this:

<script type="text/javascript"> 
    document.writeln('Your latitude is: ', geoloc.latitude);
    document.writeln('Your longitude is: ', geoloc.longitude); 
</script> 

I already tried:

<a href="http://html5doctor.com/finding-your-position-with-geolocation">this</a> 

but it displays an alert; I need object variables returned to my html code instead.

Thanks in advance

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2  
What kind of alert does it display? Is it a geolocation permission confirmation? If so, you cannot avoid it - the user must permit the user agent to query their location. –  Alexander Pavlov Mar 16 '12 at 13:44

2 Answers 2

Do you mean simply creating a JS object to store your info?

function geoloc(latitude, longitude)
{
    this.latitude=latitude;
    this.longitude=longitude;
}

Then instantiate it like so:

var userLocation = new geoloc(lat, lon);

This shows you how to get lat and long using Google API

http://www.merkwelt.com/people/stan/geo_js/sample.html

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All you should need to change is the code in the displayPosition function. Instead of alert'ing it out to the user, store the values in variables and use them wherever you want.

mycode = {
     lat: null,
     lon: null
};

function displayPosition(position) {
     mycode.lat = position.coords.latitude;
     mycode.lon = position.coords.longitude;
}
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