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How to store data from a file (upto a specified size) in to another file. Like if a file A has total size of 10 KB, I want to store 3 KB in file X and the remaining 7 KB in another file Y. How can I do this in C++. I am a beginner so bear with me..

Note: All reading and writing is done in Binary mode!

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1  
What have you done so far? Where are you struggling? –  karlphillip Mar 16 '12 at 13:45

3 Answers 3

If it's available, you could use std::copy_n and std::copy together with stream iterators:

std::ifstream input_file;
std::ofstream output_file_1;
std::ofstream output_file_2;

// ...

auto input_iterator = std::istream_iterator<char>(input_file),
// Copy 3k to first file
std::copy_n(input_iterator,
            3072,
            std::ostream_iterator<char>(output_file_1));

// Copy the remaining to the second file
std::copy(input_iterator,
          std::istream_iterator<char>(),
          std::ostream_iterator<char>(output_file_2));
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You could memorize the istream_iterator for the input file in a variable and then reuse it (and it's current position!) in the second std::copy call to avoid having to duplicate the 3027. –  Frerich Raabe Mar 16 '12 at 14:02
    
@FrerichRaabe Thanks, updated the answer. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 16 '12 at 14:04

It's very hard and complicated to do it that way. The steps to do this anyway is to open the file in binary mode (knowing that a character is X bits for example), count the file's characters (o = n, if you don't understand that then complexity = n, that means that it will take N (which is the number of characters) steps to finish it), then do some mathematical operations on that number, then make a loop that "moves" each character to another file in a loop till it reaches a certain number (300 for example at 1000 characters). The new file will have the first 300, and the old file will have those 700 characters. Pretty easy to be done in code, comment asking for so if you want that :)

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Use something like this:

FILE *f1 = fopen("file1.txt", "rb");
// assuming size of f1 to be 10*1024 bytes
FILE *f2 = fopen("file2.txt", "wb");
for(int i=0;i<3*1024;++i) fputc(fgetc(f1),f2);
fclose(f2);
FILE *f3 = fopen("file3.txt", "wb");
for(int i=0;i<7*1024;++i) fputc(fgetc(f1),f3);
fclose(f3);
fclose(f1);

Of course, this code makes a lot of assumptions, and you'll need to implement things with proper guard code (for instance, taking EOF into consideration).

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This is closer to C than C++ really; it's also rather inefficient since it's copying data one character at a time. –  Frerich Raabe Mar 16 '12 at 14:01
    
i agree, but he did say he was a beginner. –  Kaustubh Karkare Mar 16 '12 at 14:03
    
Exactly because he's a beginner I'd try to come up with a short but idiomatic solution. –  Frerich Raabe Mar 16 '12 at 14:04

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