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Dear community members,

I am actually a bit new to CSS, however I know my way around after a two weeks of studying. However at the moment I have a small problem with layers (div-tags) that I can't seem to fix. The problem is as follow, I have created the following to demonstrate my problem.

<body style="margin: 0;">
  <div style="margin: 0px auto; width: 960px;" id="main">
    <div style="clear: both; float: left; width: 100%; height: 100px;" id="one">
      Hello World
    </div>
    <div style="clear: both; float: left; width: 100%; height: 200px;" id="two">
      Hello next World!
    </div>
  </div>
</body>

The problem here is, if you "look at the borders" (I have removed; background-color and border property to increase the readability of the code), you will notice that the first main div doesn't wrap around div one and two. If I want to fix it, I only have to add some contents to the main layer. resulting in the following code:

<body style="margin: 0;">
  <div style="margin: 0px auto; width: 960px;" id="main">
    <div style="clear: both; float: left; width: 100%; height: 100px;" id="one">
      Hello World
    </div>
    <div style="clear: both; float: left; width: 100%; height: 200px;" id="two">
      Hello next World!
    </div>
  LET ME SOLVE IT!
  </div>
</body>

The question now is, how do I get the last result without adding "just contents" to my main layer?

Thank you very much for reading my question and answering it!

For images please see: http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/7808622/img/7808622.png and http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/7808636/img/7808636.png

(NOTE: all are direct links ;))

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Add overflow:hidden to your container div. This will force the div to 'wrap' around your inner divs. Welcome to Stack Overflow!

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Also, divs are block elements by default, so there is no need to add width:100% to your inner divs, as they will stretch to fit their parent div (960px) already. –  huzzah Mar 16 '12 at 14:42
    
I got a question, can you explain why actually this happens? Thank you for the warm welcome, I really appreciate your response! –  Snowflake Mar 16 '12 at 15:20
    
Heh, good question. You can find an explanation in this answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3400749/… but it's a little hard to wrap your head around. By the way, if you liked my answer and found it useful, perhaps you might consider marking it as the accepted answer so I can get a little SO rep juice. Happy coding! –  huzzah Mar 16 '12 at 15:33
    
I'm sorry for late responds. I accepted your answer. Thanks! –  Snowflake Mar 16 '12 at 20:03
    
hey no problem, thanks!!! –  huzzah Jan 14 '13 at 22:23

Snowflake
Add a clear div an put it as the last div inside your wrapper. Also, avoid usiing percentages for your width, if your wrapper has a fixed with then use fixed width for your inner divs. Hope this helps!

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