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I have a class that uses unmanaged resources in a thread, it can also go to sleep when not in use. I am implementing dispose for it, please see example code below (noting it is a dumbed down version of my app). I added while(TheThread.IsAlive()); as disposed could be set to true before DestroySomeUnmangedResouces() has executed. I don't think what I have done is correct so would be grateful if someone could suggest a better model.

protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
{
    if (!disposed)
    {
        if (disposing)
        {   
            //managed
        }

        //unmanged
        _stopTheThread = true;
        startTheThreadEvent.Set();
        while(TheThread.IsAlive());
    }
    disposed = true;
}

private void TheThread()
{
    while (!_stopTheThread)
    {
        if (state == State.Stopped)
        {
            // wait till a start occurs
            startTheThreadEvent.WaitOne();
        }
        switch (state)
        {
            case Init: 
                CreateSomeUnmangedResouces();
                break;

            case Run:       
                DoStuffWithUnmangedResouces();
                break;

            case Stop:
                DestroySomeUnmangedResouces();
                break;
        } // switch
    }
    // Release unmanaged resources when component is disposed
    DestroySomeUnmangedResouces();
}
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If your main class also has a Finalizer this is murder on the GC. –  Henk Holterman Mar 16 '12 at 15:24
    
Does this refer to using "while(TheThread.IsAlive());" or something else? –  integra753 Mar 16 '12 at 15:28
    
Please don't prefix your titles with "C#: " and such. That's what tags are for. –  John Saunders Mar 16 '12 at 16:04

4 Answers 4

You seem to want to wait until your worker thread has exited. For this you can simply use Thread.Join() which will block until your thread has exited.

Currently you are eating 100% CPU on your wait thread because you do poll if the worker thread is still alive. A less resource intensive variant is a throttled polling where you sleep between your checks at least a timeslice (15ms).

But the by far best approach is to wait for a synchronisation primitive which gets signaled and wakes up your thread when a condtion becomes true. Thead.Join is therefore the way to go.

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I see what you are saying but is it good practice to call any blocking method in a dispose method? e.g say DoStuffWithUnmangedResouces() took 5 minutes to complete. –  integra753 Mar 16 '12 at 15:23
    
You can use Thread.Join with a timeout. But it is up to you if you want to wait or not. Whatever route you choose you will have to live with the consequences (still locked resources if you try to open them again, very long shutdown times or even deadlocks during shutdown). What is better depends on your resources and how you access them and what runtime invariants you want provide. –  Alois Kraus Mar 16 '12 at 20:48
    private readonly ManualResetEvent _stopEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    private readonly ManualResetEvent _threadStoppedEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    private bool disposed;
    private int checkInterval = 10;//ms


    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                //managed
            }

            //unmanged
            _stopEvent.Set();
            _threadStoppedEvent.WaitOne();
        }
        disposed = true;
    }

    private void TheThread()
    {
        CreateSomeUnmangedResouces();

        while (!_stopEvent.WaitOne(checkInterval))
        { 
            DoStuffWithUnmangedResouces();   
        }

        DestroySomeUnmangedResouces();

        _threadStoppedEvent.Set();
    }

Or you can use Thread.Join() instead of _threadStoppedEvent if your thread isn't background

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The caller calling dispose should mop up the thread - the best way is to call Join on it as Alois has suggested. Once the thread has joined, then you can destroy the unmanaged resources which will now happen on the callers thread. E.g.:

    protected virtual void
    Dispose
        (bool disposing)
    {
        if (!disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                if(TheThread != null)
                {
                    // send a signal to stop the thread.
                    _stopTheThread = true;
                    startTheThreadEvent.Set();  

                    // Join the thread - we could timeout here but it should be the
                    // responsibility of the thread owner to ensure it exits
                    // If this is hanging then the owning object hasn't terminated
                    // its thread
                    TheThread.Join();

                    TheThread = null;
                }
            }

            // Now deal with unmanaged resources!
            DestroySomeUnmangedResouces();
        }

        disposed = true;
    }

One drawback of this approach is that we are assuming the thread will eventually exit. It could hang, meaning the signals to stop the thread was not enough. There are overloads for Join which include timeouts, which could be used to prevent hanging the calling thread (see comment in code sample above).

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I think then that I should use TheThread.Join(Int32). If this fails it would seem sensible to throw an exception (as its an exceptional circumstance)? –  integra753 Mar 16 '12 at 16:31
    
Yes you could. The Join(Int32) returns false if the thread has not terminated after the amount of time specified by the millisecondsTimeout parameter has elapsed. –  Jeb Mar 16 '12 at 16:32
    
I am using the approach above but I am seeing strange results with TheThread.Join(). When I call TheThread.Join() it blocks the main thread and TheThread. I can tell this as no debug code is output from TheThread followin the call to Join(). If I specify a timeout on TheThread.Join() it returns failed and after this I can see TheThread unblocking. I have no idea what is making this occur? –  integra753 Mar 20 '12 at 11:33
    
It's possible that the signals to stop the thread were not enough in the dispose method. It should stop immediately. Incidentally, have you marked _stopTheThread as volatile? To ensure the working thread "sees" the latest value of this boolean written by the main thread. –  Jeb Mar 20 '12 at 11:47
    
Sorry I forgot to say _stopTheThread is marked volatile. I can't understand why calling TheThread.Join() blocks TheThread meaning that it will never join. Something odd is going on :( –  integra753 Mar 20 '12 at 11:58

If a running thread holds a direct or indirect strong reference to an object, such reference will prevent the object from becoming eligible for garbage collection. There's thus not really any reason to have a finalizer on such an object.

If, however, the thread will only be relevant as long as a reference some other particular object is held by something other than the thread, it may be useful for the thread to hold a WeakReference to that other object, and shut itself down if that other object goes out of scope. This shutdown could be accomplished either by having the thread periodically check the IsAlive property of the WeakReference, or by having the other object include a finalizer which would signal the thread to shut down. Although periodic polling for such things is in some sense icky, and using a finalizer could somewhat hasten the shutdown of the thread, I think polling is probably still better. While it's possible for a finalizer to notify a thread that it should do something, and there are times when doing so may be appropriate, in general the fact that an object was finalized meant that nobody was overly concerned about prompt cleanup. Adding another few seconds' delay before the thread shuts down probably won't hurt anything.

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