Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a string[], and want to get the elements of the string[] that has an index, of which i know exist, specified in an int[].

string[] stringArray = { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g" };
int[] indices = { 1, 2, 4, 6 };

From this, I am trying to get a string[] containing { "b", "c", "e", "g" }. Preferably using a lambda expression. How would I do this?

share|improve this question
2  
You don't have a IEnumerable<string[]>, you have a string[] –  xanatos Mar 16 '12 at 15:11
    
Actually, I had an IEnumerable<string[]> ;) –  stigok Mar 16 '12 at 15:16
1  
But the example you gave was clearly of a string[], as are many of the responses you received. –  xanatos Mar 16 '12 at 15:17
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

One way you can do it is like this.

string[] result = indices.Select(i => stringArray[i]).ToArray()
share|improve this answer
    
How you are sure stringArray[i] is available? –  Saeed Amiri Mar 16 '12 at 15:15
    
The question guarantees it. –  recursive Mar 16 '12 at 18:47
    
Now not when I wrote that comment (see edits). –  Saeed Amiri Mar 16 '12 at 19:11
add comment
indices.Select(i => stringArray[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
How you are sure stringArray[i] is available? –  Saeed Amiri Mar 16 '12 at 15:15
1  
I'm not. I have no idea how an IndexOutOfRangeException is to be handled. I leave that to the OP. –  Kendall Frey Mar 16 '12 at 15:19
1  
@SaeedAmiri I'd say, that since I am providing the indices, I am implying that I know they exist. –  stigok Mar 16 '12 at 15:35
    
@sshow, I think you should edit your question, you should say that I have indices in range. your current situation is ambiguous, and I'm not the only person says this. –  Saeed Amiri Mar 16 '12 at 15:39
2  
@SaeedAmiri I have made an edit to my question to emphasize that I know the indices exist. –  stigok Mar 16 '12 at 15:45
add comment
stringArray.Where((x,index) => indices.Contains(index)); 
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you do it that way rather than, you know, the fast way? –  harold Mar 16 '12 at 15:06
1  
+1 It's safer this way –  Adrian Iftode Mar 16 '12 at 15:09
    
@Harold, As Adrian mentioned this is safer, you should always know that element[i] is available to use .Select(i=>element[i]) else you will get an unwanted exception, and question doesn't says that element[i] is always available. –  Saeed Amiri Mar 16 '12 at 15:13
    
Well I can't say I agree. Sure the exception disappears, but should you want it to? Asking for an index that doesn't exist is probably a bug somewhere else. –  harold Mar 16 '12 at 15:16
    
@harold, Q:I have a string[], and want to get the elements of the string[] that has an index specified in an int[], It doesn't says that throw an exception when specific index is not available, I think my way is closer to current version of question. but again OP should determine which is an answer, but by current Q statement IMO my answer is best (not in performance, but in correction). –  Saeed Amiri Mar 16 '12 at 15:21
show 2 more comments
foreach( int i in indices){
    string s = stringArray[i]
    //DO stuff
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Something like this:

var result= (
    from str in stringArray.Select ((a,i) =>new {a,i})
    where indices.Contains(str.i)
    select str
);
share|improve this answer
add comment

LINQ: var result = from indice in indices select stringArray[indice]
LAMBDA EXPRESSION: var result = indices.Select(i => stringArray[i])

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.