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iam totaly messed up about the NSDate class

iam doing a scheduling application, where you schedule by date

i need just to know that a schedule is for 5.3.2011 13:45 (in each time zone) and thats it (if you open the app and the local time is 5.3.2011 13:40 you see "in 5 minutes" no matter if your time zone is GMT+5 or GMT+8)...

but since NSDate stores a TIME MOMENT, not a date (as the name of the class states), iam running into several problems

1) NSDate doesn't store the timezone in which it was saved, meaning that if i have a date 5.3.2011 13:45 i don't know if it is GMT0, or its in GMT +1 (than in local time its 5.3.2011 14:45)

2) i cannot compare if two NSDates are on the same day (like the 7th of september), since they can be in different timezone (since date represents a time moment, in one zone, this time moment corresponds to one day, in the other timezone to another)

what to do?

i found methods like

-(NSDate *) dateToLocalTime
{
    NSTimeZone *tz = [NSTimeZone defaultTimeZone];
    NSInteger seconds = [tz secondsFromGMTForDate: self];
    return [NSDate dateWithTimeInterval: seconds sinceDate: self];
}

-(NSDate *) dateToGlobalTime
{
    NSTimeZone *tz = [NSTimeZone defaultTimeZone];
    NSInteger seconds = -[tz secondsFromGMTForDate: self];
    return [NSDate dateWithTimeInterval: seconds sinceDate: self];
}

but which doesn't work as expected

because they use the

NSTimeZone *tz = [NSTimeZone defaultTimeZone];
NSInteger seconds = -[tz secondsFromGMTForDate: self]; 

that means the date had to be saved in defaultTimezone to work this proper

share|improve this question
    
What does not work as expected with them? –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 16 '12 at 15:05
    
because they use the NSTimeZone *tz = [NSTimeZone defaultTimeZone]; NSInteger seconds = -[tz secondsFromGMTForDate: self]; that means the date had to be saved in defaultTimezone to work this proper –  Peter Lapisu Mar 16 '12 at 15:08
1  
Sounds like you haven't discovered NSCalendar. –  Rob Keniger Mar 16 '12 at 22:43
    
you can store only nsdate with core data –  Peter Lapisu Mar 19 '12 at 12:11
    
What is your question? NSDate is totally fine, you just need to understand the concept of calendar. –  hamstergene Mar 19 '12 at 12:18

1 Answer 1

this thread (http://www.cocoabuilder.com/archive/cocoa/278456-nsdate-without-time-portion.html) helped me a lot

i will store the date in string, so 15.7.2011 15:30, stays 15.7.2011 15:30 no matter in which time zone you are in

static NSDateFormatter * formatter = nil;

- (NSDate *) reminderLocalDate
{
    if (formatter == nil) {
        NSDateFormatter * formatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
        [formatter setDateFormat:@"YYYYMMDD"];
        [formatter setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone localTimeZone]];
    }
    //[formatter setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone localTimeZone]];
    return [formatter dateFromString:self.reminder];
}

- (void) setReminderWithLocalDate:(NSDate *)date
{
    if (formatter == nil) {
        NSDateFormatter * formatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
        [formatter setDateFormat:@"YYYYMMDD"];
        [formatter setTimeZone:[NSTimeZone localTimeZone]];
    }

    self.reminder = [formatter stringFromDate:date];
}

or even much better, to store them in NSNumber, like 20110411 so i can use the < == > operators

- (NSNumber *) toDNumber
{
    unsigned int unitFlags = NSDayCalendarUnit | NSMonthCalendarUnit | NSYearCalendarUnit;
    NSDateComponents * dc = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] components:unitFlags fromDate:self];
    return [NSNumber numberWithInt:dc.year * 10000 + dc.month * 100 + dc.day];
}

+ (NSDate *) dateWithDNumber:(NSNumber *)number
{
    NSDateComponents * dc = [[NSDateComponents alloc] init];

    int num = [number intValue];
    dc.year = num / 10000;
    num = num % 10000;

    dc.month = num / 100;
    num = num % 100;

    dc.day = num;

    return [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] dateFromComponents:dc];
}
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