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In a bash shell script today I noticed the below command at the end of the script. I know what is cd but I am unaware of the significance of a dash after it.

cd -

What does this mean? Google naively truncates the - so I am unable to find its answer.

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@n.m. No man cd on my machine, FYI. –  Dan Fego Mar 16 '12 at 15:44
    
Tried that. It will return cd-rom, compact disc, etc. –  AppleGrew Mar 16 '12 at 15:50
    
You might also want to look at the pushd and popd commands. I couldn't live without 'em. –  Brett Hale Mar 16 '12 at 16:19
2  
@n.m. - cd is not an external binary, it is a command built-in to shells. hint man bash. –  jordanm Mar 16 '12 at 16:56
    
I have man cd on my system (Gentoo), it says: This manual page is part of the POSIX Programmer's Manual etc etc. If yours is missing, you can always google man cd. –  n.m. Mar 16 '12 at 22:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

If a single dash is specified as the argument, it will be replaced by the value of OLDPWD.

The OLDPWD is set by cd command and it's the previous working directory

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Thanks. This was short and from programmer's point of view, complete. –  AppleGrew Mar 16 '12 at 15:57

cd - returns to the directory you were previously.

For instance:

marcelo@marcelo:~$ cd /opt
marcelo@marcelo:/opt$ cd /usr/bin
marcelo@marcelo:/usr/bin$ cd -
/opt
marcelo@marcelo:/opt$ 

I was in /opt, changed to /usr/bin, and then went back to /opt with cd -

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cd - brings you back to the last directory.

$ cd ~/Desktop
$ pwd
/Users/daknok/Desktop
$ cd /
$ pwd
/
$ cd -
$ pwd
/Users/daknok/Desktop
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cd - returns to the previous directory you were in.

Say I'm in /usr/ and I type cd /var/local/someplace/else

Then I use cd - I'll return to /usr

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From the manual

An argument of - is equivalent to $OLDPWD. If a non-empty directory name from CDPATH is used, or if - is the first argument, and the directory change is successful, the absolute pathname of the new working directory is written to the standard output. The return value is true if the directory was successfully changed; false otherwise

Therefore the - is equivalent to the $OLDPWD, which holds the last directory which the shell was in, and is set by the previous cd invocation.

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From the man found here : http://ss64.com/bash/cd.html

Quickly get back
$ cd - 
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