Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not sure how to explain it because I don't really know the correct terms, but here is an example:

template <typename T>
struct PointerWrapper {
    T *ptr;
};

struct Base {};

struct Derived : public Base {};

void test(PointerWrapper<Base>) {}

int main() {
    PointerWrapper<Derived> p;
    test(p);
    return 0;
}

Since "Derived" is derived from "Base" and the "PointerWrapper" struct only works with pointers to the type specified by the template, there is nothing wrong with this. But the compiler complains:

asdfg.cpp:15:11: error: could not convert ‘p’ from ‘PointerWrapper<Derived>’ to ‘PointerWrapper<Base>’

I even tried test(reinterpret_cast<PointerWrapper<Base>>(p)), but it says:

asdfg.cpp:15:51: error: invalid cast from type ‘PointerWrapper<Derived>’ to type ‘PointerWrapper<Base>’

So what should I do?

share|improve this question
1  
You can't do this (easily). PointerWrapper<A> and PointerWrapper<B>are entirely different, unrelated types. At best you can implement something like std::static_pointer_cast, but that requires you to write some code. –  Kerrek SB Mar 16 '12 at 16:24
    
What is static_pointer_cast? I cannot find it in any C++ reference sites. (and why did one of the answers just disappear?) –  mtk358 Mar 16 '12 at 16:40
    
Take a look at a real reference site :-) Anyway, the point is that you need to write the obvious conversion function yourself. –  Kerrek SB Mar 16 '12 at 16:44
    
I did search that site and it shows no results: link. Anyway, I'm not using std::shared_ptr in this situation, so I don't see how it helps. –  mtk358 Mar 16 '12 at 16:47
1  
That was just an example to illustrate the point that you need to write something like template <typename T, typename U> PointerWrapper<U> convert(PointerWrapper<T> const &). There should be an std::is_base_of trait check in there somewhere, or perhaps std::is_constructible. –  Kerrek SB Mar 16 '12 at 16:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

PointerWrapper<Base> and PointerWrapper<Derived> are utterly different types, despite the relationship between Base and Derived.

If you want to allow any PointerWrapper<> to be passed in, do:

template<typename T>
void test(PointerWrapper<T>)
{ }

If you want to allow only PointerWrapper<T> instances where T is derived from Base, do:

template<typename T>
void test(
    PointerWrapper<T>,
    typename std::enable_if<std::is_base_of<Base, T>::value, void*>::type = 0
)
{ }

If you're using C++03, replace std:: with boost:: and get rid of ::value.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, but what if you, for example, have a std::vector<PointerWrapper<Base>> and want to store PointerWrappers for various derived classes of Base in it? –  mtk358 Mar 16 '12 at 16:34
    
@mtk358 : If that's your scenario, you should have mentioned it in the question. ;-] I don't have a good answer for that offfhand; refer to KerrekSB's comment. –  ildjarn Mar 16 '12 at 16:35
    
I thought that it wasn't relavent since I thought that there was a way to either make the compiler know that it's safe or force the compiler to ignore the fact that the types are different (which is what I thought reinterpret_cast does). –  mtk358 Mar 16 '12 at 16:42
    
@mtk358 : C++ is a strongly, statically typed language, and you're working with entirely different types. Putting a conversion constructor/operator inside of PointerWrapper<> is probably your best bet. –  ildjarn Mar 16 '12 at 16:44
    
Thanks, that did it. I added template <typename U> PointerWrapper(const PointerWrapper<U> &orig) : ptr(static_cast<T*>(orig.ptr)) {} to PointerWrapper and now the example compiles. –  mtk358 Mar 16 '12 at 16:52

you can do that :

struct Base {};

struct Derived : Base {};

struct PointerWrapperBase {
    virtual Base* getBase() = 0;
};

template <typename T>
struct PointerWrapper : PointerWrapperBase {
    virtual Base* getBase() { return this->ptr; }
    T *ptr;
};

void test(PointerWrapperBase&) {}

int main() {
    PointerWrapper<Derived> p;
    test(p);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Adding a vtable defeats the purpose of using CRTP in the first place IMO, but +1 for a correct solution nonetheless. –  ildjarn Mar 16 '12 at 17:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.