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I would like to create an 3D array in numpy as follow :

[ 0 1 0 1 0 1
  0 1 0 1 0 1
  0 1 0 1 0 1
  0 1 0 1 0 1
  0 1 0 1 0 1 ] ...

Is there a nice way to write it ?

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Using np.tile:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([0, 1])
my_tiled_array = np.tile(a, (3, 3))

Result:

array([[0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
       [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
       [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1]])

Edit:
As @DSM suggests in a comment, if you really want a 3D array -- which is not entirely clear to me from your code sample -- you can use:

my_3d_tiled_arr = np.tile(a, (3, 3, 3))

Result:

array([[[0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
        [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
        [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1]],

       [[0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
        [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
        [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1]],

       [[0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
        [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1],
        [0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1]]])
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1  
Isn't that a 2D array? (It's entirely possible -- probable, even -- that's what the OP is really looking for, of course.) – DSM Mar 16 '12 at 17:20
    
@DSM, thank you for your comment. I will add another example to (hopefully) cover all the bases. – bernie Mar 16 '12 at 17:26

If you want a 1-D array, (again, it's not clear exactly what you want), you could do something like:

np.mod(np.arange(10),2)
Out[4]: array([0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1])

which could, of course, be reshaped if needed. But, I think bernie's answer is much better and clearer.

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+1 nice to see yet another way, thanks for your answer – bernie Mar 31 '12 at 8:27

@bernie's method is great. A faster way of achieving the same thing can be to move elements (virtually) around instead of copying a pair of [0, 1] a lot of times. You could do the following :

import numpy as np
A1 = np.concatenate([np.zeros(108), np.ones(108)]).reshape((2,108))
A2 = A1.transpose()
A3 = A2.reshape((6,6,6))

The first line initializes a bunch of zeros and ones and packs them into a 2x108 array. The second line barely makes it into a 108x2 array. Then, the last line re-slices the array so it is 6x6x6 and looks like what you are looking for.

The only thing to look out for is the number of elements. Say you want a final 3D array of 6x6x6, like in my example, you multiply the length of all axis (which gives us 216), then divide by 2 (= 108). That number is the number of both ones and zeros, And the number used in the .reshape((2, n)) function call.

The reason it is so fast is that initializing vectors of zeros or ones is really quick, faster than copying an arbitrary array. Then, moving elements, like what .transpose() and .reshape() do, barely changes the way the elements are referenced, instead of moving the elements themselves in memory.

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+1, nice one. This one goes in my numpy recipe file – doug Mar 19 '12 at 7:10

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