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I have three difference examples mention below. I don't understand why ex1 has same output for ex2 and differ output for ex3, also why ex2 is not the same as ex3 where I just make a creation in another line!!

ex1

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
    int x=2;
    int *y;
    y = &x;
    printf("value: %d\n", *y);
    printf("address: %d\n", y);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

output

value: 2
address: 2686744

ex2

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
    int x=2;
    int *y = &x;
    printf("value: %d\n", *y);
    printf("address: %d\n", y);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

output

value: 2
address: 2686744

ex3

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void) {
    int x=2;
    int *y;
    *y = &x;
    printf("value: %d\n", *y);
    printf("address: %d\n", y);
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

output

value: 2686744
address: 2130567168

I HAVE BIG MISUNDERSTANDING OF POINTERS WHEN I THINK STAR MUST BECOME WITH (y) NOT (int) AND I FIGURE OUT THAT STAR WITH (int) NOT (y) (^_^) NOW EVERYTHING IS CLEAR FOR ME... THANKS FOR ALL YOUR ANSWERS

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4  
Turn up your compiler warning level, and you should be told about the problem... –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 16 '12 at 16:55
3  
ex3 is not valid. If y was never set you cannot take *y. –  asveikau Mar 16 '12 at 16:56
1  
Also you should get in the habit of using %p when printing pointers, not %d. (But still use %d for integer types like *y.) –  asveikau Mar 16 '12 at 16:58
    
@Oli Charlesworth I want to understanding that in memory level not as compiler said, which is not enough information for me. –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In example 3, you first declare a pointer:

int *y;

and then you say that the int value of *y is the address of x.

That's because with the declaration int *y you have:

  • y is of type int *
  • *y is of type int.

So, the right lines of code in example 3 should be:

int *y;
y = &x;
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thanks for your answer. so I have to give y address of x, but if I don't the compiler will asign to y a random value. is my explanation correct? –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:19
    
No, it's not a random value. With *y = &x you are getting the integer representation of the address of x. –  Nicolás Mar 16 '12 at 17:30
    
in ex3 when I print y. why I got this value 2130567168? what that value represented for? –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:38

Because the third example says *y = instead of y =

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thanks for your answer. –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:26
*y

is used to know the content of the adress pointed by y

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thanks for your answer. –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:28

Hmm, lets bring everything in one line:

int *y
ex1:    y = &x
ex2:    y = &x
ex3: (*y) = &x

Ex3 is different from the other two.

Ex3 is assigning the value (&x) to the value pointed-to by the pointer y.

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thanks for your answer. so if I write "int *y = &x;" that's mean value of y is address of x. is that correct ? –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:25
    
@thalsharif: Basically yes, but this was valid only if y was of type int**, and y did actually point to something (which it doesn't) –  datenwolf Mar 16 '12 at 17:40

int *y; *y = &x; is different from int *y = &x;. In the former you are setting the content of the memory location that y points to with the address of x. Whereas in the latter you are initializing the pointer y to the address of x. So if you remove the * from *y = &x, you will see the same output as ex1 & ex2.

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thanks for your answer –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:44

On ex3, *y = &x; means that you will store the address of x inside the memory block pointed by y. This is a problem since y is not actually pointing to anything.

Whatever printf("address: %d\n", y); prints, will not be a useful information.

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thanks for your answer –  thalsharif Mar 16 '12 at 17:45

In declaring the type, * means "a pointer." After that it's a dereference operator. Consider:

int x=2;
int *y;
y=&x;
*y = x;

This is appropriate as far as addresses are assigned addresses, values values. However, the dereference operator gives you the contents, so *y=x doesn't last out of scope. You should treat it like a temporary. That's why if you pass *y into a function and modify it, you won't see the modifications when you print *y. You have to pass y in, that is "pass by reference." In short, &*y=&x is unstable, and not equivalent to y=&x.

See l-value and r-value in C.

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