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I've worked a fair amount with singleton classes in C++ (for a class), and now for a not-class project, I'm attempting to use inherited classes.

For some reason, I'm being really thick about constructor chains.

Consider the following:

class SuperClass
{
    string privateKey;
    string publicKey;
    string name;

public:
    enum Key {PUBLIC, PRIVATE};
    SuperClass(Key, string);
};

SuperClass::SuperClass(Key key, string theKey)
{
    switch(key)
    { 
        case PUBLIC: publicKey = theKey;
                     break;
        case PRIVATE: privateKey = theKey;
                     break;
    }
}


class SubClass : private SuperClass
{
public:
    SubClass(string key);
};

SubClass::SubClass(string key)
: SuperClass(SuperClass::PUBLIC, key) // "SubClass" will only interact with the public key, in this case.
{
    cout << "I'm instantiated!" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    SubClass example ("thisIsThePublicKey");
    return 0;
}

When compiling, I get the following error:

error: no matching function ncall to SuperClass::SuperClass()
note: candidates are: SuperClass::SuperClass(SuperClass::Key, std::string)

Why do I get this? Haven't I used the constructor it says is a candidate? I feel like I've read every tutorial on constructor chains, and I still don't get what I'm supposed to be doing differently.

Thanks for any help!

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closed as not a real question by Rob Kennedy, Tom Thorogood, Will Mar 27 '12 at 16:00

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Review the code in the question, or better simplify the actual code and post it directly. In the conversion you have not added the inheritance relationship and the modified code should not expose the behavior you talk about. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 16 '12 at 17:21
    
-1 and voted to close. Code provided here doesn't exhibit the problem reported in the question, and the answer accepted isn't relevant to the real problem, whatever that might be. –  Rob Kennedy Mar 16 '12 at 19:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe you forgot to inherit from your super class:

class SubClass

Should be:

class SubClass : public SuperClass
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, that was bad transcription. My actual code reads: "class SubClass : private SuperClass"...changing the above to reflect. I do have it set to private so it can access "privateKey" and "publicKey"---shoudl I not have done that? Maybe I don't understand how private/public works in the inheritance context. –  Tom Thorogood Mar 16 '12 at 17:20
1  
@TomThorogood with private SuperClass it compiles for me: ideone.com/d2XUR –  Seth Carnegie Mar 16 '12 at 17:22
    
Whilst to be fair the error message you are getting certainly seems a bit fishy for this to have been the problem, apart from this your code looks fine to me and in fact compiles here. Are you sure you don't have any other transcription errors, ie. a beneficial one? –  Charles Keepax Mar 16 '12 at 17:23
    
@SethCarnegie Thanks for that. I may have to see if I have some ridiculous typo in my actual code, then. This is driving me crazy on this end. Maybe I'll just start over. I haven't gotten that far. /grin. –  Tom Thorogood Mar 16 '12 at 17:24
1  
@TomThorogood The public/private on the inheritance indicates whether another class using SubClass can "see" that it's also a SuperClass. It gives SubClass no more ability to interact with private data members in SuperClass. –  That Chuck Guy Mar 16 '12 at 17:26

I don't think you've posted all the relevant code for your example, as the above code compiles for me with g++.

That said, however, I can guess from the error message that Subclass has a default constructor in it somewhere, or some other second constructor that you have not posted in your example yet, defined something like this:

SubClass::SubClass() // No argument constructor
{
    cout << "Default constructor (no initialization)." << endl;
 }

This will implicitly try to call the SuperClass::SuperClass() default constructor. Usually C++ will generate a default constructor for you if you don't provide any constructors at all. However, since you have defined a constructor that takes parameters for SuperClass, C++ won't generate a default constructor for it.

Another possibility is: you have created another subclass of SuperClass, with no constructors, and thus C++ is generating an implicit default constructor. However, C++'s generated implicit constructor can't find a default SuperClass constructor to invoke.

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First of all I can't see in your SubClass definition where you specify the inheritance. It must be something like this for public inheritance:

class SubClass : public SuperClass
{
 // definition
}
share|improve this answer

You must inherit from SuperClass:

class SubClass : public SuperClass
{
public:
    SubClass(string key);
};

Your example compiles also fine if I use private inheritance.

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