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I've got some models that represents different kinds of points a user can earn:

class User
  has_many :totals
end

class Total
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :total_type
end

class TotalType
  has_many :totals
end

And there are named types like points and goals. I added a nice method_missing to Total:

def method_missing(method, *args, &block)
  if TotalType.find_by_name(method)
    joins(:total_type).where(:total_type => { :name => method }).sum(total)
  else
    super
  end
end

And that lets me do some sweet dynamic stuff like:

user = User.first
user.totals.points #=> 100
user.totals.goals  #=> 10

Now the hard part. I want to be able to call those same points and goals method on User directly. If I use delegate then I need to know the name of the methods ahead of time:

class User
  # ...
  delegate :points, :totals, :to => :totals
end

But of course I'd prefer that was dynamic as well. I tried creating a method_missing on User but when I try to send something to totals I get NoMethodError: undefined method 'points' for #<Array:0x007fd2016e1510> so apparently the association proxy has already transformed the result set into an array (super left out to keep the example simple):

class User
  #...
  def method_missing(method, *args, &block)
    totals.send(method, *args, &block)
  end
end  

user = User.first
user.totals.points  #=> 100
user.points  #=> NoMethodError: undefined method 'points' for #<Array:0x007fd2016e1510>

How can I forward this call onto totals without having to hardcode those dynamic finder names? Any help would be appreciated, thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What about using a named scope instead? –  Tom L Mar 16 '12 at 19:09
    
But I'd have to give the scope a hardcoded name like 'points' or 'goals'...I really want those to be dynamic. –  Rob Cameron Mar 16 '12 at 20:14
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2 Answers

Yeah, using a named_scope (or class method) is your best bet.

For example, if this is totals.rb:

class Total < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :total_type

  def self.points
    joins(:total_type).where(:total_types => {:name => 'points'}).sum(:total)
  end
end

and this is users.rb:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :totals

  def method_missing(name, *args, &blk)
    if totals.respond_to? name
      totals.send(name, *args, &blk)
    else
      super
    end
  end
end

then User.first.points #=> 100

You could make this even more dynamic... but the code is harder to follow and if you don't cache some stuff then a lot of unnecessary SQL queries are being performed. For example, total.rb could be like this:

class Total < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :total_type

  def self.method_missing(name, *args, &blk)
    if TotalType.find_by_name(name.to_s)
      joins(:total_type).where(:total_types => {:name => name.to_s}).sum(:total)
    else
      super
    end
  end

  def self.respond_to_missing?(name, priv)
    if TotalType.find_by_name(name.to_s)
      true
    else
      super
    end
  end

end

So when User.first.points gets called, first User#method_missing gets called, which sees if user.totals.respond_to? :points. It doesn't at first, so Total::respond_to_missing gets called, which sees if there's a total_type called 'points'. There is... so it's called and then Total::method_missing is called, which gives you back the sum of points for that user.

Of course you could easily cache results so the unnecessary SQL queries aren't performed every time user.points is called in the method_missing and respond_to_missing methods, but it just gets too complicated and the method overhead isn't worth it. The less dynamic solution I offered earlier is your best bet with how your models are laid out now.

Hope this helps,

-Luke

share|improve this answer
    
But you had to hardcode the name of the method in Total (def self.points)...I want those to all be dynamic so as new types are created in the database they're ready to be used in the code. –  Rob Cameron Mar 23 '12 at 23:32
    
Yeah, that's why I gave the second example for the more dynamic way. –  luke-gru Mar 25 '12 at 17:01
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If dynamics are your concern, a named scope like by_total_type might solve the problem.

class Total

  scope :by_total_type, lambda { |ttype| joins(:total_type).where(:type => ttype) }

end

Then you can say:

Total.by_total_type('point')

Or

user.totals.by_total_type('goal')
share|improve this answer
    
But that's no fun, I want the syntax of user.totals.points (which already works with my original method_missing) and user.points and then as new point types are added to the database they just become available to call on the models without hardcoding any method names anywhere: user.goals, user.rebounds, user.assists, etc. –  Rob Cameron Mar 23 '12 at 23:34
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