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I tried a Google search for it but didn't come up with anything. Does anyone know if this can be done? If not is there an elegant work around this?

Update: I think Frank Osterfeld's answer is the most clear solution. Thanks for all the other answers, I've upvoted your answers.

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4  
What do you mean exactly? enum are a compile-time thing. At runtime, only integral values exist. What does "create an enum" means to you? When does it happen, for you? – Basile Starynkevitch Mar 16 '12 at 19:42
1  
Why are you trying to do this? A little context will help. Bascially enums are a collection of things - playing cards, months of the year, day of the week etc.. You cannot add an extra day to the week - despite a manager think that they can! – Ed Heal Mar 16 '12 at 19:43
    
@Ed: ok, then I'll need you to come in on Saturday – bernie Mar 16 '12 at 19:46
    
MY last manager did not like my response or me showing him my contract. The second word of that conversation was off - My child is more important. – Ed Heal Mar 16 '12 at 19:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As others said, you cannot redeclare an enum (in which context, which one should used, anyway?).

If you just need some constants, and want extend them for a special case, you can use multiple enum declarations, one extending the other and then use ints to hold the values:

enum Error { NoError=0, AllIsBroken, WhatTheHellAreYouDoing, UserDefinedError };

enum NetworkError { HostNotFound=UserDefinedError+1, ConnectionTimeout, ... };

int error = HostNotFound;

if ( error == NoError )
    ...
if ( error == HostNotFound )
    ...
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I think this is the most clear solution. Thanks for all the other answers, I've upvoted your answers. – mihajlv Mar 16 '12 at 20:22

You cannot reopen the same enum with different value:

enum Colors { Red, Blue, Yellow };
enum Colors { Green = 3 }; // ERROR

In C, however, all enums are automatically convertable to each other. So just create a new enum, like this:

enum Colors { Red, Blue, Yellow };
enum MoreColors { Green = 3 };

int foo()
{
  enum Colors c;
  c = Green; // This will compile
}
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No; once an enumeration type is complete, you can't extend it:

enum Blarney { Kirkpatrick, Donegal, Ireland };

enum Blarney { Eire = 3 };  // Not allowed!

There isn't a workaround for it, at one level. At another level, you can simply use int values to hold items from an enumeration:

enum Blarney { Kirkpatrick, Donegal, Ireland };
enum BlarneyX { Eire = 3 };

void function(void)
{
    enum Blarney b = Kirkpatrick;
    int y = Kirkpatrick;

    y = Eire;
    y = Donegal;
    switch (y)
    {
    case Kirkpatrick:
    case Donegal:
         printf("Something\n");
         break;
    case Eire:
         printf("Different\n");
         break;
    }

    switch (b)
    {
    case Kirkpatrick:
         printf("Kirkpatrick\n");
         break;
    case Donegal:
         printf("Donegal\n");
         break;
     }
     ...
}

The compiler might warn you about missing out the case Ireland in the second switch; it can't do so with the first.

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+1 happy st. patty's day – bernie Mar 16 '12 at 19:45

What do you mean with "once it has been created"? enums are types, that are "created" at compile time. But since all enums share the same "namespace" (a concept that does not exists in C), you can declare other enums independently. However, you can't "redeclare" an enum.

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No, you can't add to an 'enum', because the values could be replaced with constants when the translation unit that uses those values is compiled, depending on debugging options, optimization, etc. Besides, what would possibly reference the new values in the already compiled translation unit? You'd have to recompile.

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No. As others have said, a C enum is a compile-time thing.

In some languages, like Javascript, you can create objects that are treated as enums. For example:

var Colors = { "Red":0xf00, "Blue":0x00f, "Green":0x0f0 };
Colors["Cyan"]=0x0ff;

var bgColor = Colors.Red;

If you need to simulate this method of mapping strings to values in C (not C++), you'll need some sort of tree or hash table which is not part of the C standard library. In C++, just use std::map<std::string, int>.

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