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I want to remove the clicked element from the page after a certain amount of time (1.5 seconds). Here is the code (including some background info):

function AttachEvent(element, type, handler) {
    if (element.addEventListener) {
        element.addEventListener(type, handler, false);
    } else if (element.attachEvent) {
        element.attachEvent('on' + type, handler)
    } else {
        element['on' + type] = handler;
    }
}

AttachEvent(window, "load", function() {

    AttachEvent(mydiv, "click", do_stuff); 
});

function do_stuff(e){
    e = e || window.event;
    var target = e.target || e.srcElement;  

    //some stuff        

    //remove object
    setTimeout('target.parentNode.removeChild(element);', 1500);
}

Internet Explorer complains about target being undefined in the anonymous function. How do I set this timeout in Internet Explorer?

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What is element in setTimeout('target.parentNode.removeChild(element);', 1500);? –  William Mar 16 '12 at 20:22
    
I don't know. I must have overlooked that when I initially inserted the code into my script. –  reggie Mar 16 '12 at 20:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Don't use a string for setTimeout. Just don't. Instead pass an anonymous function (demo):

function do_stuff(e){
    e = e || window.event;
    var target = e.target || e.srcElement;  

    //some stuff        

    //remove object
    setTimeout(function(){target.parentNode.removeChild(target);}, 1500);
}

If you use the function above, the current value of target will be used inside of the anonymous function. If you pass a string, your browser looks for a global object named target, which will fail, since target a function scope variable.

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