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I'm looking through the knockout tutorials, and all the examples create the view model using the 'new' keyword:

//from learn.knockoutjs.com
function AppViewModel() {
  this.firstName = ko.observable("Bert");
  this.lastName = ko.observable("Bertington");
  this.fullName = ko.computed(function() {
    return this.firstName() + " " + this.lastName();    
  }, this);
}
ko.applyBindings(new AppViewModel());

I'm trying to avoid using the new keyword, which usually works perfectly ok, but I find trouble getting the fullName computed property to work. This is what I've come up with so far.

function makeViewModel() {
  return {
  firstName: ko.observable("Bert"),
  lastName: ko.observable("Bertington"),
  fullName: ko.computed(function() {
    return this.firstName() + " " + this.lastName();    
  }, this) };
}
ko.applyBindings(makeViewModel());

...which obviously fails since 'this' no longer refers to the local object inside the function passed to computed. I could get around this by creating a variable and store the view model before attaching the computed function and returning it, but if there exists a more elegant and compact solution that doesn't require me to make sure that methods that depend on each other are attached in the correct order, I'd sure like to use that instead.

Is there a better solution?

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For me the most important question is: why are you trying to avoid the new keyword? As,John Papa said, there are ways to make objects without new but why? It is just a preference of yours (you don't like new's ) or you have some specific problems when using it ? –  George Mavritsakis Dec 22 '12 at 16:09
    
I try to avoid the new keyword until I figure out this: jsperf.com/ffs-constructors –  Zaz Jan 2 '13 at 15:26
    
@GeorgeMavritsakis: one reason to consider avoiding new is to imagine the damage that might be caused if someone using the code forgot to use new, for instance, ko.applyBindings(AppViewModel()); This will add (or replace the values of firstName, lastName, etc. on the current context, perhaps the browser's Window object. That might not be too harmful. But what if the constructor included a line such as this.Date = ...? Suddenly the Date constructor has been overridden. That's one good reason. –  Scott Sauyet Jan 2 '13 at 17:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When creating it in a function, it is not necessary to return a new object. Instead you would do:

var ViewModel = function() {
    this.firstName = ko.observable("Bert");
    this.lastName = ko.observable("Bertington");
    this.fullName = ko.computed(function() {
         this.firstName() + " " + this.lastName();
    }, this);
};

Now you have access to the proper this in the computed observable.

If you really do not want to use "new" (there is no reason why you should not in this case), then you could do something like:

var createViewModel = function() { 
    var result = {
        firstName: ko.observable("Bert"),
        lastName: ko.observable("Bertington")
    };

    result.fullName = ko.computed(function() {
        return result.firstName() + " " result.lastName();
    });

    return result;
};
share|improve this answer
    
how would I call this code without using 'new'? –  Zaz Mar 16 '12 at 21:31
    
You would use "new" in this case, but your "this" would be correct in your computed observable. –  RP Niemeyer Mar 17 '12 at 1:48

You can enforce new like so (taken from this great pattern resource)

function Waffle() {
    if (!(this instanceof Waffle)) {
    return new Waffle();
    }

    this.tastes = "yummy";
}

However I am unsure what you mean by

I'm trying to avoid using the new keyword, which usually works perfectly ok, but I find trouble getting the fullName computed property to work. This is what I've come up with so far.

This should work fine, can you show us a concrete example in jsfiddle that doesn't work with using new.

Hope this helps.

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You can certainly get around using the new keyword by making the function self invoking, but I think you'd be better off solving the problem of the "this" keyword. I like to show people 3 ways to create viewmodels.

  1. object literal http://jsfiddle.net/johnpapa/u9S93/
  2. as a function http://jsfiddle.net/johnpapa/zBqxy/
  3. with the Revealing Module Pattern http://jsfiddle.net/johnpapa/uRXPn/

When using option 2 or 3 above, it is much easier to deal with the "this" keyword.

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