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I'm trying to bind a custom class to the itemssource member of a WPF DataGrid from c#. I implemented IList, but for some reason I can't get the list to show any members.

I'm setting the ItemsSource property in C# by calling

    dataGridObject.ItemsSource = switchHolderObject

Here is the definition for my value:

    public class AssetHolder<T> : Dictionary<string,T>, IList<T>, INotifyCollectionChanged, INotifyPropertyChanged where T : Asset
    {
        ... // lots of code here
        new public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
        {
            var enumerator = base.GetEnumerator();
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                var pair = enumerator.Current;
                yield return pair.Value;
            }
        }
    }
    public class NonGenericAssetHolder : AssetHolder<Asset> {}
    public class SwitchHolder : NonGenericAssetHolder {}

The reason I have three classes here is to get around the fact that dictionaries in C# are not covariant.

I have verified that all my implemented IList methods are working properly, and the list does expand and have the appropriate data, but the DataGrid still shows no members. The strange thing is that it works when I add this method to the AssetHolder class:

    public List<T> Hack()
    {
        List<T> result = new List<T>();
        foreach (T asset in this)
        {
            result.Add(asset);
        }
        return result;
    }

and constantly re-bind the DataGrid like this:

    SwitchGrid.ItemsSource = _tempLocation.Switches.Hack();

However, that creates a huge performance hit, and I feel like it should work the way it is. Anyone know what's going on? Why won't the DataGrid show my data?

share|improve this question
    
Have you implemented the GetEnumerator() right? Are you using it? On a side note: I always set the DataContext of an ItemsControl in code-behind and set the ItemsSource in Xaml just to ItemsSource="{Binding}" this way you have more change of BindingErrors appearing in the output window, so you can diagnose better what's going wrong. – Silvermind Mar 17 '12 at 0:49
    
I guess, it depense on place, where you fill data in AssetHolder class. You must fill it in constructor to use it in the way like this. Or, you can bind ItemsSource to the Hack method, but you should use AssetHolder<T> as return type, IMO: public AssetHolder<T> Hack() { return this; } – JiKra Mar 17 '12 at 1:37
    
@Silvermind Dictionary implements IEnumerable, so I just modified the GetEnumerator function to return only the values. I have confirmed that it works properly, and I added it to my post above. – hypehuman Mar 17 '12 at 13:02
    
Have you also confirmed that it works properly when not accessed by code but only by Xaml by putting a breakpoint inside the GetEnumerator? This way we will now if the Xaml triggers it, sorry if you pointed this out already, just making sure. – Silvermind Mar 17 '12 at 13:08
    
@Silvermind modified the binding as you suggested, but unfortunately in this case I still didn't get any BindingErrors. – hypehuman Mar 17 '12 at 13:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Edit

I'v just implemented the IDictionary interface and added a private variable of Dictionary.

For demonstration purposes I've only used the Add and GetEnumerator in the Interface. This way we can do this for starters using a testclass Person:

AssetHolder<Person> persons = new AssetHolder<Person>( );
persons.Add("One", new Person( ) { FirstName = "Jack" , LastName = "Jobs" , Age = 63 } );
persons.Add( "Two" , new Person( ) { FirstName = "Peter" , LastName = "Lastname" , Age = 33 } );
persons.Add( "Three" , new Person( ) { FirstName = "Wally" , LastName = "Breakfast" , Age = 33 } );
dataGrid1.DataContext = persons;

XAML:

<DataGrid AutoGenerateColumns="False" ItemsSource="{Binding}" Name="dataGrid1">
  <DataGrid.Columns>
    <DataGridTextColumn Width="1*" Header="FirstName" Binding="{Binding Path=FirstName}"/>
  </DataGrid.Columns>
</DataGrid>

Just a quick test, but this is the AssetHolder, look at the GetEnumerator():

public class AssetHolder<T> : IDictionary<string , T>
  {

    Dictionary<string , T> dictionary;

    public AssetHolder()
    {
      dictionary = new Dictionary<string , T>( );
  }

    public void Add( string key , T value )
    {
      dictionary.Add( key , value );
    }

    public bool ContainsKey( string key )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    public ICollection<string> Keys
    {
      get { throw new NotImplementedException( ); }
    }

    public bool Remove( string key )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    public bool TryGetValue( string key , out T value )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    public ICollection<T> Values
    {
      get { throw new NotImplementedException( ); }
    }

    public T this[string key]
    {
      get
      {
        throw new NotImplementedException( );
      }
      set
      {
        throw new NotImplementedException( );
      }
    }

    public void Add( KeyValuePair<string , T> item )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    public void Clear( )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    public bool Contains( KeyValuePair<string , T> item )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    public void CopyTo( KeyValuePair<string , T>[ ] array , int arrayIndex )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    public int Count
    {
      get { throw new NotImplementedException( ); }
    }

    public bool IsReadOnly
    {
      get { throw new NotImplementedException( ); }
    }

    public bool Remove( KeyValuePair<string , T> item )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<string , T>> IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string , T>>.GetEnumerator( )
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException( );
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator( )
    {
      return dictionary.Values.GetEnumerator( );
    }
  }

Person Class:

  public class Person
  {
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName{get;set;}
    public int Age { get; set; }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
I have some c# code that calls foreach on AssetHolder, but now it's telling me that it can't convert from KeyValuePair to AssetObject. How do I specify which GetEnumerator to use? – hypehuman Mar 17 '12 at 14:18
    
But yay! It works! I'm not sure why my original solution didn't work, but I'm glad that this one does. – hypehuman Mar 17 '12 at 14:23
    
@hypehuman Glad it worked. Could you accept? :) – Silvermind Mar 17 '12 at 14:57
    
I did a little more testing and this is what I learned: properly sending notification events (or removing the INotify interfaces) was necessary to get anything to show in the DataGrid. But just doing that was not enough, because my code was still returning KeyValuePairs as foreach results. Your typeless GetEnumerator method was required to make each result show as a single Asset object. – hypehuman Mar 19 '12 at 20:10
    
@hypehuman I guess that implementing the IList does not override the GetEnumerator of the derived Dictionary. Nice thing it worked for you. – Silvermind Mar 19 '12 at 22:45

I figured it out! The reason my implementation didn't work is because I included the INotifyCollectionChanged and INotifyPropertyChanged interfaces, but I was not explicitly telling it when to notify. When I stopped implementing them, it magically worked!

share|improve this answer

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