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I'm using Spring Validator implementations (http://static.springsource.org/spring/docs/current/spring-framework-reference/html/validation.html) to validate my object and I would like to know how do you write a unit test for a validator like this one:

public class CustomerValidator implements Validator {

private final Validator addressValidator;

public CustomerValidator(Validator addressValidator) {
    if (addressValidator == null) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(
          "The supplied [Validator] is required and must not be null.");
    }
    if (!addressValidator.supports(Address.class)) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(
          "The supplied [Validator] must support the validation of [Address] instances.");
    }
    this.addressValidator = addressValidator;
}

/**
* This Validator validates Customer instances, and any subclasses of Customer too
*/
public boolean supports(Class clazz) {
    return Customer.class.isAssignableFrom(clazz);
}

public void validate(Object target, Errors errors) {
    ValidationUtils.rejectIfEmptyOrWhitespace(errors, "firstName", "field.required");
    ValidationUtils.rejectIfEmptyOrWhitespace(errors, "surname", "field.required");
    Customer customer = (Customer) target;
    try {
        errors.pushNestedPath("address");
        ValidationUtils.invokeValidator(this.addressValidator, customer.getAddress(), errors);
    } finally {
        errors.popNestedPath();
    }
}
}

How can I unit test CustomerValidator without calling the real implementation of the AddressValidator (by mocking it)? I've haven't seen any example like that...

In other words, what I really want to do here is to mock the AddressValidator which is called and instanciated inside the CustomerValidator... is there a way to mock this AddressValidator?

Or maybe I'm looking at it the wrong way? Maybe what I need to do is to mock the call to ValidationUtils.invokeValidator(...), but then again, I'm not sure how to do such a thing.

The purpose of what I want to do is really simple. The AddressValidator is already fully tested in another test class (let's call it th AddressValidatorTestCase). So when I'm writing my JUnit class for the CustomerValidator, I don't want to "re-test" it all over again... so I want the AddressValidator to always return with no errors (through the ValidationUtils.invokeValidator(...) call).

Thanks for your help.

EDIT (2012/03/18) - I've managed to find a good solution (I think...) using JUnit and Mockito as the mocking framework.

First, the AddressValidator test class:

public class Address {
    private String city;
    // ...
}

public class AddressValidator implements org.springframework.validation.Validator {

    public boolean supports(Class<?> clazz) {
        return Address.class.equals(clazz);
    }

    public void validate(Object obj, Errors errors) {
        Address a = (Address) obj;

        if (a == null) {
            // A null object is equivalent to not specifying any of the mandatory fields
            errors.rejectValue("city", "msg.address.city.mandatory");
        } else {
            String city = a.getCity();

            if (StringUtils.isBlank(city)) {
            errors.rejectValue("city", "msg.address.city.mandatory");
            } else if (city.length() > 80) {
            errors.rejectValue("city", "msg.address.city.exceeds.max.length");
            }
        }
    }
}

public class AddressValidatorTest {
    private Validator addressValidator;

    @Before public void setUp() {
        validator = new AddressValidator();
    }

    @Test public void supports() {
        assertTrue(validator.supports(Address.class));
        assertFalse(validator.supports(Object.class));
    }

    @Test public void addressIsValid() {
        Address address = new Address();
        address.setCity("Whatever");
        BindException errors = new BindException(address, "address");
        ValidationUtils.invokeValidator(validator, address, errors);
        assertFalse(errors.hasErrors());
    }

    @Test public void cityIsNull() {
        Address address = new Address();
        address.setCity(null); // Already null, but only to be explicit here...
        BindException errors = new BindException(address, "address");
        ValidationUtils.invokeValidator(validator, address, errors);
        assertTrue(errors.hasErrors());
        assertEquals(1, errors.getFieldErrorCount("city"));
        assertEquals("msg.address.city.mandatory", errors.getFieldError("city").getCode());
    }

    // ...
}

The AddressValidator is fully tested with this class. This is why I don't want to "re-test" it all over again in the CustomerValidator. Now, the CustomerValidator test class:

public class Customer {
    private String firstName;
    private Address address;
    // ...
}

public class CustomerValidator implements org.springframework.validation.Validator {
    // See the first post above
}

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class CustomerValidatorTest {

    @Mock private Validator addressValidator;

    private Validator customerValidator; // Validator under test

    @Before public void setUp() {
        when(addressValidator.supports(Address.class)).thenReturn(true);
        customerValidator = new CustomerValidator(addressValidator);
        verify(addressValidator).supports(Address.class);

        // DISCLAIMER - Here, I'm resetting my mock only because I want my tests to be completely independents from the
        // setUp method
        reset(addressValidator);
    }

    @Test(expected = IllegalArgumentException.class)
    public void constructorAddressValidatorNotSupplied() {
        customerValidator = new CustomerValidator(null);
        fail();
    }

    // ...

    @Test public void customerIsValid() {
        Customer customer = new Customer();
        customer.setFirstName("John");
        customer.setAddress(new Address()); // Don't need to set any fields since it won't be tested

        BindException errors = new BindException(customer, "customer");

        when(addressValidator.supports(Address.class)).thenReturn(true);
        // No need to mock the addressValidator.validate method since according to the Mockito documentation, void
        // methods on mocks do nothing by default!
        // doNothing().when(addressValidator).validate(customer.getAddress(), errors);

        ValidationUtils.invokeValidator(customerValidator, customer, errors);

        verify(addressValidator).supports(Address.class);
        // verify(addressValidator).validate(customer.getAddress(), errors);

        assertFalse(errors.hasErrors());
    }

    // ...
}

That's about it. I found this solution pretty clean... but let me know what you think. Is it good? Is it too complicated? Thanks for your feedback.

share|improve this question
1  
You should have created an answer rather then edit the original question with an answer. Then you could accept your answer (if you thought it was still the best). That's the normal way of handling this scenario I believe. It's always good to have an accepted answer if other people have the same problem. –  Dave Jul 13 '12 at 13:29
    
These lines should refer to the customerValidator I think, not the addressValidator. I don't really see the point in verifying that validator.supports is called - it's the validate method invocation you are interested in. I would say. verify(addressValidator).supports(Address.class); // verify(addressValidator).validate(customer.getAddress(), errors); –  Mark Chorley Jun 19 '13 at 13:12

1 Answer 1

It is a really straight forward test without any mock. (only the creation of the error object is a bit tricky)

@Test
public void testValidationWithValidAddress() {
    AdressValidator addressValidator = new AddressValidator();
    CustomValidator validatorUnderTest = new CustomValidator(adressValidator);

    Address validAddress = new Address();
    validAddress.set... everything to make it valid

    Errors errors = new BeanPropertyBindingResult(validAddress, "validAddress");
    validatorUnderTest.validate(validAddress, errors);

    assertFalse(errors.hasErrors()); 
}


@Test
public void testValidationWithEmptyFirstNameAddress() {
    AdressValidator addressValidator = new AddressValidator();
    CustomValidator validatorUnderTest = new CustomValidator(adressValidator);

    Address validAddress = new Address();
    invalidAddress.setFirstName("")
    invalidAddress.set... everything to make it valid exept the first name

    Errors errors = new BeanPropertyBindingResult(invalidAddress, "invalidAddress");
    validatorUnderTest.validate(invalidAddress, errors);

    assertTrue(errors.hasErrors());
    assertNotNull(errors.getFieldError("firstName"));
}

BTW: if you really want to make it more complicate and make it complicate by a mock, then have a look at this Blog, they use a two mocks, one for the object to test (ok, this is useful if you can not create one), and a second for the Error object (I think this is more complicated the it must be.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer and... you're absolutely right... I could simply create a new instance of my Address object and set everything to make it valid and then call the validator without any mock. The thing is... that's not exactly what I want to do here. I'm a little stubborn and like I said I want my validators tests classes to be completely independant from each other. I've managed to find a good solution (I think...) using JUnit and Mockito as the mocking framework. (See the last edit of my post (2012/03/18)) –  user1274068 Mar 18 '12 at 5:26
    
I'm using Spock rather than JUnit, but this helped me a lot. Thanks! It would have taken me a while to figure out how to instantiate an Error object in a useful way, and I probably would have done a lot more mocking. –  procrastinate_later Oct 8 '13 at 17:09

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