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Here's the faulty bit of my code:

class Room(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.hotspots = []
        self.image = []
        self.item = []

    def newhotspot(*args):
        new = {'Name' : None,
               'id' : None,
               'rect' : None,
               'Takeable' : None,
               'Lookable' : None,
               'Speakable' : None,
               'Itemable' : None,
               'Goable' : None}

        for i in args:
            new[i[0]] = i[1]
        new['id'] = len(self.hotspots)
        self.hotspots.append(new)

CityTrader = Room()

CityTrader.newhotspot(('Name', 'Trader'),
                      ('Takeable', 'Yes'))

The goal is to have a dictionary with all the keys set to none but the ones specified. However, when I run it I get:

[...]line 85 in <module>
('Takeable', 'Yes'))
[...]line 44, in newhotspot
new[i[0]] = i[1]
TypeError : 'Room' object does not support indexing

Anyone knows why and how to solve this? It seems to work when it's not wrapped inside a class.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You forgot the self parameter to newhotspot():

def newhotspot(self, *args):
    ...

Since self will be implicitly passed anyway, it ends up as the first item of args.

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O_o stupid me... thanks –  Dominic Grenier Mar 16 '12 at 22:03
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Every class method must take self as it's first argument.

Try this:

class Room(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.hotspots = []
        self.image = []
        self.item = []

    def newhotspot(self, *args):
       new = {'Name' : None,
       'id' : None,
       'rect' : None,
       'Takeable' : None,
       'Lookable' : None,
       'Speakable' : None,
       'Itemable' : None,
       'Goable' : None}

       for i in args:
           new[i[0]] = i[1]
       new['id'] = len(self.hotspots)
       self.hotspots.append(new)

CityTrader = Room()

CityTrader.newhotspot(('Name', 'Trader'),
                      ('Takeable', 'Yes'))
share|improve this answer
    
Wrong, class methods take the class as first argument. Instance methods have self as the first parameter. –  Sven Marnach Mar 16 '12 at 22:18
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