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When I run the following code I get told, that talk is not a function. Why?

function cat(name) {
    talk = function() {
        alert(" say meeow!" )
    }
} 

cat("felix");
cat.talk()
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Were you trying to make a class cat, or define an object which had a function talk? –  Chris Carew Mar 16 '12 at 22:06
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4 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

What you're trying to do is create an object for which the function is a constructor, but what the code is actually doing is setting the variable talk to a function. You want:

function cat(name) {
    this.talk = function() {
        alert(" say meeow!" )
    }
} 

var myCat = new cat("felix");
myCat.talk()

edit:

Relevant javascript tech talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ljNi8nS5TtQ

He talks about constructing objects with functions at about 30 minutes in. The code he posts is:

function Circle(radius){
    this.radius = radius;
    this.area = function(){
        return this.radius * this.radius * Math.PI;
    };
}
var instance = {};
Circle.call(instance, 5);
instance.area(); // ==> 78.5398
var instance2 = new Circle(5);
instance2.area() // ==> 78.5398
instance instanceof Circle // ==> false
instance2 instanceof Circle // ==> true

And the relevant quote:

The new keyword is just a shorthand that is saying "make a new object and call the constructor on it ... the new keyword has no other meaning"

In other words, he's saying that when using the new keyword, you're defining your variable as an object and calling the function in the context of that object (this points to your object).

The extra thing that the new keyword does is set the prototype of the newly made object to the prototype of the constructor. So if we do:

function Circle(radius){
    this.radius = radius;
    this.area = function(){
        return this.radius * this.radius * Math.PI;
    };
}
var instance = {};
Circle.call(instance, 5);
instance.__proto__ = Circle.prototype; // we set the prototype of the new object to that of the constructor
instance.area(); // ==> 78.5398
var instance2 = new Circle(5);
instance2.area() // ==> 78.5398
instance instanceof Circle // ==> true // this is now true 
instance2 instanceof Circle // ==> true

instance instanceof Circle is now true.

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2  
+1, beat me to it, although you should probably explain why this works, and the OP's version doesn't. –  RMorrisey Mar 16 '12 at 22:07
    
+1 from me as well, and the example code I was going to post was identical :) (char for char). –  pete Mar 16 '12 at 22:09
    
@RMorrisey, Yeah, that's true. I was looking for that tech talk I just posted to verify anything I'm going to say. I still probably won't do it much justice, but I'll post it in a second. –  mowwwalker Mar 16 '12 at 22:16
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To make your code work as desired you would have to write:

function Cat(name) {
    this.talk = function() {
        alert(" say meeow!" )
    }
};

var c = new Cat("felix");
c.talk()

The function Cat is then a constructor function, and the returned object has a property (talk) which is a function that you can call.

Your original code actually declared a global function talk which wasn't part of the cat function at all, since it was missing the var keyword.

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That's simply because it isn't.

You have created a function and assigned to a variable in the cat function, but that variable doesn't belong to the function. As you don't declare the variable anywhere, it implicitly becomes global, so it's actually available outside the function, but not the way that you try to use it.

You would have to add the function as a property to the cat function object, in order for you to be able to call it that way:

function cat(name) {
  cat.talk = function() {
    alert(" say meeow!" )
  }
} 

cat("felix");
cat.talk()

However, you might be looking for an object that has a method, rather than a function that has a property that is a method:

function Cat(name) {
  this.name = name;
}

Cat.prototype.talk = function() {
  alert(this.name + " says meeow!");
}

var felix = new Cat("Felix");
felix.talk();
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actually his talk function is global, not local –  Alnitak Mar 16 '12 at 22:08
    
@Guffa, check if you are ok with my edit. BTW, your sample achieves something most people don't expect - addition property on given function, unlike property of a new object created by "cat" constructor. –  Alexei Levenkov Mar 16 '12 at 22:10
    
Yes, you are right, it's a global variable. I made some extensive editing myself, but I incorporated your point. –  Guffa Mar 16 '12 at 22:14
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cat is not an object. It's a function, and I don't think JavaScript supports this.

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4  
Well, functions are objects too, so you can actually add properties to a function. –  Guffa Mar 16 '12 at 22:08
    
Wow, didn't know that :D –  PhpXp Mar 16 '12 at 22:09
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