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I have a Class A...in it's constructor...I am assigning an anonymous function to Object_B's eventHandler.

How do I remove (unsubscribe) that from Dispose method of class A ?

Any help would be appreciated ! Thanks

Public Class A
{

public A()
 {

 B_Object.DataLoaded += (sender, e) =>
                {
                   Line 1
                   Line 2
                   Line 3
                   Line 4
                };
 }

Public override void Dispose()
{
  // How do I unsubscribe the above subscribed anonymous function ?
}
}
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What is B_Object? Is it a member variable of Class A? And is it accessed anywhere outside A; might it have other listeners? –  Dax Fohl Mar 16 '12 at 22:29
    
possible duplicate of Unsubscribe anonymous method in C# –  Tim Schmelter Mar 16 '12 at 22:31
    
yes, it's member...which instance of Class B –  Relativity Mar 16 '12 at 22:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can't, basically. Either move it into a method, or use a member variable to keep the delegate for later:

public class A : IDisposable
{
    private readonly EventHandler handler;

    public A()
    {
        handler = (sender, e) =>
        {
           Line 1
           Line 2
           Line 3
           Line 4
        };

        B_Object.DataLoaded += handler;
     }

     public override void Dispose()
     {
        B_Object.DataLoaded -= handler;
     }
}
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damn, you beat me! –  Robbie Mar 16 '12 at 22:31
    
So, if we didnt unsubscribe that...it will obviously introduce a memory leakage, right ? –  Relativity Mar 16 '12 at 22:38
1  
@Relativity: Not necessarily. You haven't really talked about B_Object.DataLoaded - if that's actually an instance event rather than a static event, then if the object is collected the event subscription won't matter any more. It all depends on context... –  Jon Skeet Mar 16 '12 at 22:40
    
B_Object.DataLoaded is an instance event..not static event. Could you please clarify this : - "if the object is collected the event subscription won't matter " –  Relativity Mar 16 '12 at 22:42
1  
@Relativity: If object X subscribes to any events from object Y but does not unsubscribe, the dangling events will cause object X to stay in memory at least as long as object Y. If the memory lifetime of object Y will be much longer than the useful lifetime of object X, this can be a bad thing. If during the memory lifetime of object Y, many instances of object X will be created and abandoned, it can be very bad if not disastrous. If, however, Y will be eligible for collection when time X becomes useless, the dangling subscription will not keep X alive. –  supercat Mar 19 '12 at 16:21

The right way to do this is to use the Rx Extensions. Go watch the videos here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/data/gg577611

I found the "blues" movie particularly useful.

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This is an alternative without using a handler variable.

Public Class A
{

 public A()
  {

    B_Object.DataLoaded += (sender, e) =>
                {
                   Line 1
                   Line 2
                   Line 3
                   Line 4
                };
  }

  Public override void Dispose()
  {
   if(B_Object.DataLoaded != null)
   {
     B_Object.DataLoaded -=
         (YourDelegateType)B_Object.DataLoaded.GetInvocationList().Last();
       //if you are not sure that the last method is yours than you can keep an index
       //which is set in your ctor ...
   }
  }
 }
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