Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have complicated problem with storing XML structure of objects.

First object:

<DetailsStructure>
    <DetailsRelation name="X">
        <Type name="A">
            <Template id="123"/>
        </Type>
    </DetailsRelation>
</DetailsStructure>

Second object:

<DetailsStructure>
    <DetailsRelation name="X">
        <Type name="A">
            <Template id="123">
                <DetailsRelation>
                    <Type name="B">
                        <Template id="111">
                            <DetailsRelation>
                                <Type name="C">
                                    <Template id="222">
                                </Type>
                            </DetailsRelation>
                        </Template>
                    </Type>
                </DetailsRelation>
            </Template>
            <Template id="1321" />
        </Type>
    </DetailsRelation>
</DetailsStructure>

Let's say that first structure is our initial one. We can add some nodes to that structure and we end up with structure number 2. However one node can cotain whole blocks of XML. E.g. we have added 'template id="111"' and 'template id="1321"' to the first structure. 'template id="111"' had internal structure ('template id="222"') and every change made to that internal structure (e.g. removing internal 'template id="222"') has to be propagated wherever 'template id="111"' was used.

We open object which is described by means of:

<DetailsStructure>
    <DetailsRelation>
        <Type name="B">
            <Template id="111">
                <DetailsRelation>
                    <Type name="C">
                        <Template id="222">
                    </Type>
                </DetailsRelation>
            </Template>
        </Type>
    </DetailsRelation>
</DetailsStructure>

and delete a piece of the structure. Result structure:

<DetailsStructure>
    <DetailsRelation>
        <Type name="B">
            <Template id="111"/>
        </Type>
    </DetailsRelation>
</DetailsStructure>

Now, when I open First object structure it should be like that:

<DetailsStructure>
    <DetailsRelation name="X">
        <Type name="A">
            <Template id="123">
                <DetailsRelation>
                    <Type name="B">
                        <Template id="111"/>
                    </Type>
                </DetailsRelation>
            </Template>
            <Template id="1321" />
        </Type>
    </DetailsRelation>
</DetailsStructure>

To sum up: we should be able to create simple structures and then bigger structures described by means of smaller ones. When smaller structure changes - it is propagated in every place from bigger structure where smaller one was used.

Can this problem be solved? Is it complicated?

share|improve this question
    
Rather than describe your XML implementation it might be better to start with what you're trying to accomplish. It sounds like you may have jumped into implementation with the wrong architecture. – Jim Garrison Mar 17 '12 at 1:23
    
You may be right. So I will present my problem. The goal is to describe Devices. One particular Device consist of other devices. E.g. computer consist of: motherboard, motherboard has slots and slots have cards, CPU, RAM. However CPU consist of transistors and other components. When I open, let's say, CPU structure and do some modifications, these modifications should be visible when I open computer and motherboard structure (they have CPU). – Lucas Smith Mar 17 '12 at 13:04
    
Is there any simple solution? I think that this problem is difficult. Am I right? – Lucas Smith Mar 17 '12 at 13:04
    
I have chosen XML because Devices have tree structure and XML is natural language to describe tree-like structures. – Lucas Smith Mar 17 '12 at 13:05

I think your XML should look like this instead:

<Devices>
   <Device Type="CPU" Id="cpu001">
      <Componentes>
        . . . 
      </Components> 
   </Device>

   <Device Type="Motherboard" Id="mtb001">
      <Componentes>
         <Id>cpu001</Id>
         . . .  
      </Components> 
   </Device>

   <Device Type="Computer" Id="cpt001">
      <Componentes>
         <Id>mtb001</Id>
         . . . 
      </Components> 
   </Device>

   . . . 

 <Devices>

In this way each device appears only once, and can be modified in isolation. All the other devices that uses it will reflect the change because they do not contain it, they just reference that single instance.

This is a relational structure though - better suited for a relational database than XML.

I think a database will be a better choice in general - XML is a good format to represent and transmit static data but it is not suited if you want to make changes to the data.

share|improve this answer
    
MiMo, your idea is good but the situation is more complicated. I have "Computer" (cpt001) with "Motherboard" (mtb001). I want to insert additional card into that motherboard but only in cpt001 computer. So I have to mark that situation. Any ideas? – Lucas Smith Mar 17 '12 at 21:16
    
You'll have to create a new motherboard that is a copy of mtb001, add the additinal card to it and change the refernece in cpt001 to use this new motherboard. – MiMo Mar 19 '12 at 13:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.