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When a C# WinForms text box receives focus, I want to select all the text in the textbox.

To see what I mean, click in your web browser's address bar. See how all text was selected? I want to do that.

FASTEST GUN ALERT: please read the following before answering! Thanks guys. :-)

Calling .SelectAll() during the .Enter or .GotFocus events won't work because if the user clicked the textbox, the caret will be placed where he clicked, thus deselecting all text.

Also, calling .SelectAll() during the .Click event won't work because the user won't be able to select any text with the mouse; the .SelectAll() call will keep overwriting the user's text selection. )

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3  
Please clarify this is for a "RichTextBox." –  Nescio Sep 18 '08 at 23:10
    
Nescio, a text box or a rich text box will do. I tried your solution on a text box too. –  Judah Himango Sep 19 '08 at 14:04
    
This is an abstraction leak. The best way to do it it to flag WM_MOUSEACTIVATE and SelectAll on WM_SETFOCUS if not WM_MOUSEACTIVATE-ing. –  wqw Jan 30 '10 at 16:02
    
WPF Version: stackoverflow.com/questions/4161531/… –  Jonathan Allen Nov 12 '10 at 4:06

25 Answers 25

up vote 69 down vote accepted

First of all, thanks for answers! 9 total answers. Thank you.

Bad news: all of the answers had some quirks or didn't work quite right (or at all). I've added a comment to each of your posts.

Good news: I've found a way to make it work. This solution is pretty straightforward and seems to work in all the scenarios (mousing down, selecting text, tabbing focus, etc.)

bool alreadyFocused;

...

textBox1.GotFocus += textBox1_GotFocus;
textBox1.MouseUp += textBox1_MouseUp;
textBox1.Leave += textBox1_Leave;

...

void textBox1_Leave(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    alreadyFocused = false;
}


void textBox1_GotFocus(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // Select all text only if the mouse isn't down.
    // This makes tabbing to the textbox give focus.
    if (MouseButtons == MouseButtons.None)
    {
        this.textBox1.SelectAll();
        alreadyFocused = true;
    }
}

void textBox1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    // Web browsers like Google Chrome select the text on mouse up.
    // They only do it if the textbox isn't already focused,
    // and if the user hasn't selected all text.
    if (!alreadyFocused && this.textBox1.SelectionLength == 0)
    {
        alreadyFocused = true;
        this.textBox1.SelectAll();
    }
}

As far as I can tell, this causes a textbox to behave exactly like a web browser's address bar.

Hopefully this helps the next guy who tries to solve this deceptively simple problem.

Thanks again, guys, for all your answers that helped lead me towards the correct path.

share|improve this answer
    
What about when focus is programmatically set to a TextBox? I have that problem as discussed here: stackoverflow.com/questions/24790704/… I was able to solve it, after a fashion, but I am still nervous about it, as my "fix" seems rather kludgy. –  B. Clay Shannon Jul 17 at 18:34
    
You wrote, "Calling .SelectAll() during the .Enter or .GotFocus events won't work because if the user clicked the textbox, the caret will be placed where he clicked, thus deselecting all text." I do have SelectAll in the GotFocus event which, for the most part, works. In fact, I would think the cursor being placed where the user clicked is "a good thing." I just want it to always be selected when focus is set to the TextBox programmatically. –  B. Clay Shannon Jul 17 at 18:52

Your solution is good, but fails in one specific case. If you give the TextBox focus by selecting a range of text instead of just clicking, the alreadyFocussed flag doesn't get set to true, so when you click in the TextBox a second time, all the text gets selected.

Here is my version of the solution. I've also put the code into a class which inherits TextBox, so the logic is nicely hidden away.

public class MyTextBox : System.Windows.Forms.TextBox
{
    private bool _focused;

    protected override void OnEnter(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnEnter(e);
        if (MouseButtons == MouseButtons.None)
        {
            SelectAll();
            _focused = true;
        }
    }

    protected override void OnLeave(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnLeave(e);
        _focused = false;
    }

    protected override void OnMouseUp(MouseEventArgs mevent)
    {
        base.OnMouseUp(mevent);
        if (!_focused)
        {
            if (SelectionLength == 0)
                SelectAll();
            _focused = true;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for custom textbox suggestion and perfectly working solution! –  Fueled Oct 5 '11 at 9:51
    
This doesn't seem to work when you "tab" into the control. –  Stephan Jan 9 '13 at 8:14
    
Terrific solution. Copied your code right into my solution, changed the namespace to protect the innocent, and worked perfectly. Thanks! –  kenswdev Jan 28 at 22:25

I found a simpler solution to this. It involves kicking off the SelectAll asynchronously using Control.BeginInvoke so that it occurs after the Enter and Click events have occurred:

In C#:

private void MyTextBox_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // Kick off SelectAll asyncronously so that it occurs after Click
    BeginInvoke((Action)delegate
    {
        MyTextBox.SelectAll();
    });
}

In VB.NET (thanks to Krishanu Dey)

Private Sub MyTextBox_Enter(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles MyTextBox.Enter 
    BeginInvoke(DirectCast(Sub() MyTextBox.SelectAll(), Action)) 
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Simple, one liner that works perfectly. –  Larry Mar 25 '13 at 13:28
    
Why does this work so well? –  Nick Oct 18 '13 at 14:01
2  
Smartest Answer I've ever found.. Thanks a lot.. For VB.net Here is the Solution.. Private Sub MyTextBox_Enter(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles MyTextBox.Enter BeginInvoke(DirectCast(Sub() MyTextBox.SelectAll(), Action)) End Sub –  Krishanu Dey Oct 29 '13 at 9:47
1  
Thanks @KrishanuDey - I've updated the answer. –  Duncan Smart Oct 30 '13 at 11:39
2  
In .Net 4.0 you can do: BeginInvoke((Action)MyTextBox.SelectAll); –  JoelFan May 8 at 17:44

It's a bit kludgey, but in your click event, use SendKeys.Send( "{HOME}+{END}" );

share|improve this answer
    
Woofta! That is a bit of hackery! :-) Thanks for the suggestion. Any better ideas? –  Judah Himango Sep 18 '08 at 22:27
    
Hacking indeed, but this doesn't sound bad at all –  Djerry Apr 30 '10 at 13:06
2  
Consider that a lot of anti-virus programs intercept and block SEND KEYS as malicious. It's not a great solution. –  Judah Himango Sep 23 '10 at 14:43

Click event of textbox? Or even MouseCaptureChanged event works for me. - OK. doesn't work.

So you have to do 2 things:

private bool f = false;

private void textBox_MouseClick(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{ 
  if (this.f) { this.textBox.SelectAll(); }
  this.f = false;
}

private void textBox_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  this.f = true;
  this.textBox.SelectAll();
}
private void textBox_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e) // idea from the other answer
{
  this.f = false; 
}

Works for tabbing (through textBoxes to the one) as well - call SelectAll() in Enter just in case...

share|improve this answer
    
Ok Jakub, that partially works. If I tab to the text box, it needs to focus. Will that work with your solution? (If you can show me how, I'll mark your answer as the correct answer.) –  Judah Himango Sep 18 '08 at 22:34
    
Jakub, now that you've posted the code, it seems to sometimes work. Not always; right now I'm clicking into the text box and it's not selecting all. –  Judah Himango Sep 19 '08 at 13:48
    
Could you describe when it doesn't work? –  Jakub Kotrla Sep 19 '08 at 19:11
    
Sometimes I'll click into the text and it doesn't select all. It's like somehow the .f field isn't set to what it should be, and then SelectAll doesn't get called. Haven't seen this? –  Judah Himango Sep 20 '08 at 20:18
    
I know only that because of mouseMouve you can slow-click while move mouse (especially on wide letters) -> unset the flag. You can remove the code in mouseMove event, but than you get - after tabbgin to control and then clicking - reSelectAll - unable to select part of stirng on first drag –  Jakub Kotrla Sep 20 '08 at 23:44

Here's a helper function taking the solution to the next level - reuse without inheritance.

    public static void WireSelectAllOnFocus( TextBox aTextBox )
    {
        bool lActive = false;
        aTextBox.GotFocus += new EventHandler( ( sender, e ) =>
        {
            if ( System.Windows.Forms.Control.MouseButtons == MouseButtons.None )
            {
                aTextBox.SelectAll();
                lActive = true;
            }
        } );

        aTextBox.Leave += new EventHandler( (sender, e ) => {
            lActive = false;
        } );

        aTextBox.MouseUp += new MouseEventHandler( (sender, e ) => {
            if ( !lActive )
            {
                lActive = true;
                if ( aTextBox.SelectionLength == 0 ) aTextBox.SelectAll();
            }   
        });
    }

To use this simply call the function passing a TextBox and it takes care of all the messy bits for you. I suggest wiring up all your text boxes in the Form_Load event. You can place this function in your form, or if your like me, somewhere in a utility class for even more reuse.

share|improve this answer
'Inside the Enter event
TextBox1.SelectAll();

Ok, after trying it here is what you want:

  • On the Enter event start a flag that states that you have been in the enter event
  • On the Click event, if you set the flag, call .SelectAll() and reset the flag.
  • On the MouseMove event, set the entered flag to false, which will allow you to click highlight without having to enter the textbox first.

This selected all the text on entry, but allowed me to highlight part of the text afterwards, or allow you to highlight on the first click.

By request:

    bool entered = false;
    private void textBox1_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        entered = true;
        textBox1.SelectAll();   //From Jakub's answer.
    }

    private void textBox1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (entered) textBox1.SelectAll();
        entered = false;
    }

    private void textBox1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        if (entered) entered = false;
    }

For me, the tabbing into the control selects all the text.

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is similar to Jakub's solution. It works for clicking. Can it work when tabbing to the text box? (E.g. tabbing to your browser's address bar will select all text too.) –  Judah Himango Sep 18 '08 at 22:36
    
Yes it works for tabbing too. I wrote a test app and this is the way that I got it working. –  MagicKat Sep 18 '08 at 22:53
    
Doesn't seem to work for tabbing. Can you show us the code that's working for tabbing? –  Judah Himango Sep 18 '08 at 23:17

A one line answer that I use...you might be kicking yourself...

In the Enter Event:

txtFilter.BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker( txtFilter.SelectAll));

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, doesn't work. It selects all text, alright, but it also prevents the user from selecting just part of the text, among other problems. –  Judah Himango Apr 6 '09 at 22:03
    
Sorry, I must have misunderstood the behavior you were looking for. On enter it selects all, if you click and hold it select from beginning to your cursor. I suppose you could use what I have and replace SelectAll with your own select logic. notifywire.com/demos/2009-04-14_1248.swf –  Ian Apr 14 '09 at 17:07

This is similar to nzhenry's popular answer, but I find it easier to not have to subclass:

    Private LastFocused As Control = Nothing

Private Sub TextBox1_Enter(sender As Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles TextBox1.Enter, TextBox2.Enter, TextBox3.Enter
    If MouseButtons = Windows.Forms.MouseButtons.None Then LastFocused = sender
End Sub

Private Sub TextBox1_Leave(sender As Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles TextBox1.Leave, TextBox2.Leave, TextBox3.Leave
    LastFocused = Nothing
End Sub

Private Sub TextBox1_MouseUp(sender As Object, e As System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs) Handles TextBox1.MouseUp, TextBox2.MouseUp, TextBox3.MouseUp
    With CType(sender, TextBox)
        If LastFocused IsNot sender AndAlso .SelectionLength = 0 Then .SelectAll()
    End With
    LastFocused = sender
End Sub
share|improve this answer

SelectAll never worked for me.

This works.

ActiveControl = textBox1;
textBox1->SelectionStart = 0;
textBox1->SelectionLength = textBox1->Text->Length;
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't account for the case where tabbing into the textbox brings focus. It also exhibits some of the other problems discussed in this thread. –  Judah Himango May 2 '12 at 22:35

This worked for a WPF/XAML TextBox.

    private bool initialEntry = true;
    private void TextBox_SelectionChanged(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (initialEntry)
        {
            e.Handled = true;
            initialEntry = false;
            TextBox.SelectAll();
        }
    }
    private void TextBox_GotFocus(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        TextBox.SelectAll();
        initialEntry = true;      
    }
share|improve this answer

The answer can be actually quite more simple than ALL of the above, for example (in WPF):

public void YourTextBox_MouseEnter(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        YourTextBox.Focus();
        YourTextBox.SelectAll();
    }

of course I can't know how you want to use this code, but the main part to look at here is: First call .Focus() and then call .SelectAll();

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private bool _isSelected = false;
private void textBox_Validated(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    _isSelected = false;
}

private void textBox_MouseClick(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
{
    SelectAllText(textBox);
}

private void textBox_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    SelectAllText(textBox);
}

private void SelectAllText(TextBox text)
{
    if (!_isSelected)
    {
        _isSelected = true;
        textBox.SelectAll();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I just tested with a RichTextBox. Doesn't work. Clicking into the textbox doesn't appear to select all text. (Because it's getting deselected on mouse down, when the caret is placed at the cursor.) –  Judah Himango Sep 18 '08 at 23:07

Interestingly, a ComboBox with DropDownStyle=Simple has pretty much exactly the behaviour you are looking for, I think.

(If you reduce the height of the control to not show the list - and then by a couple of pixels more - there's no effective difference between the ComboBox and the TextBox.)

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, but I really need this to work on TextBox and RichTextBox. –  Judah Himango Mar 21 '09 at 19:22

Why don't you simply use the MouseDown-Event of the text box? It works fine for me and doesn't need an additional boolean. Very clean and simple, eg.:

private void textbox_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e) {
    if (textbox != null && !string.IsNullOrEmpty(textbox.Text))
    {
        textbox.SelectAll();
    } }
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, couple problems with this: doesn't account for if the textbox already has focus (we don't want to select-all every mouse down, just when the textbox didn't have focus), doesn't let you select just a portion of the text, doesn't work when bring focus via tabbing to the textbox. –  Judah Himango Nov 22 '08 at 19:32

I called SelectAll inside MouseUp event and it worked fine for me.

    private bool _tailTextBoxFirstClick = false;

    private void textBox1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        if(_textBoxFirstClick)           
            textBox1.SelectAll();

        _textBoxFirstClick = false;
    }  

    private void textBox1_Leave(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _textBoxFirstClick = true;
        textBox1.Select(0, 0);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, see the other answers (and comments) for why this doesn't work in all scenarios. –  Judah Himango Oct 27 '09 at 1:23
    
I did not check for tab for this solution. My bad. Thanks for pointing out. Glad to see that you have the complete solution now. And also glad to know that my suggestion for MouseUp was included in your solution. –  Sreejith K. Oct 27 '09 at 16:32

Just derive a class from TextBox or MaskedTextBox:

public class SMaskedTextBox : MaskedTextBox
{
    protected override void OnGotFocus(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnGotFocus(e);
        this.SelectAll();
    }
}

And use it on your forms.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. To understand why, see the other answers and comments. –  Judah Himango Jan 6 '10 at 16:48

Have you tried the solution suggested on the MSDN Forum "Windows Forms General" which simply subclasses TextBox?

share|improve this answer
    
I believe we tried that. However, I don't recall the shortcoming with that solution. –  Judah Himango Jan 1 '09 at 3:12

Actually GotFocus is the right event (message really) that you are interested in, since no matter how you get to the control you’ll get this even eventually. The question is when do you call SelectAll().

Try this:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        this.textBox1.GotFocus += new EventHandler(textBox1_GotFocus);
    }

    private delegate void SelectAllDelegate();    
    private IAsyncResult _selectAllar = null; //So we can clean up afterwards.

    //Catch the input focus event
    void textBox1_GotFocus(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //We could have gotten here many ways (including mouse click)
        //so there could be other messages queued up already that might change the selection.
        //Don't call SelectAll here, since it might get undone by things such as positioning the cursor.
        //Instead use BeginInvoke on the form to queue up a message
        //to select all the text after everything caused by the current event is processed.
        this._selectAllar = this.BeginInvoke(new SelectAllDelegate(this._SelectAll));
    }

    private void _SelectAll()
    {
        //Clean-up the BeginInvoke
        if (this._selectAllar != null)
        {
            this.EndInvoke(this._selectAllar);
        }
        //Now select everything.
        this.textBox1.SelectAll();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ali, this doesn't work. Try mousing down in the middle of the text. Hold down the mouse button for 1 second. –  Judah Himango Sep 19 '08 at 13:55

I created a new VB.Net Wpf project. I created one TextBox and used the following for the codebehind:

Class MainWindow 

Sub New()

    ' This call is required by the designer.
    InitializeComponent()

    ' Add any initialization after the InitializeComponent() call.
    AddHandler PreviewMouseLeftButtonDown, New MouseButtonEventHandler(AddressOf SelectivelyIgnoreMouseButton)
    AddHandler GotKeyboardFocus, New KeyboardFocusChangedEventHandler(AddressOf SelectAllText)
    AddHandler MouseDoubleClick, New MouseButtonEventHandler(AddressOf SelectAllText)
End Sub

Private Shared Sub SelectivelyIgnoreMouseButton(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As MouseButtonEventArgs)
    ' Find the TextBox
    Dim parent As DependencyObject = TryCast(e.OriginalSource, UIElement)
    While parent IsNot Nothing AndAlso Not (TypeOf parent Is TextBox)
        parent = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(parent)
    End While

    If parent IsNot Nothing Then
        Dim textBox As Object = DirectCast(parent, TextBox)
        If Not textBox.IsKeyboardFocusWithin Then
            ' If the text box is not yet focussed, give it the focus and
            ' stop further processing of this click event.
            textBox.Focus()
            e.Handled = True
        End If
    End If
End Sub

Private Shared Sub SelectAllText(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As RoutedEventArgs)
    Dim textBox As Object = TryCast(e.OriginalSource, TextBox)
    If textBox IsNot Nothing Then
        textBox.SelectAll()
    End If
End Sub

End Class

share|improve this answer

For a group of textboxes in a form:

private System.Windows.Forms.TextBox lastFocus;   

private void textBox_GotFocus(object sender, System.Windows.Forms.MouseEventArgs e)   
{
    TextBox senderTextBox = sender as TextBox;
    if (lastFocus!=senderTextBox){
        senderTextBox.SelectAll();
    }
    lastFocus = senderTextBox;   
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't work properly; see my replies to the other answers that suggest .SelectAll(). It doesn't work because if you enter the textbox while trying to select text, it breaks your text selection by selecting all the text. You only want to select text if focus entered the textbox via mouse up or tabbing into it, but if the focus was caused via mouse down. –  Judah Himango May 26 '11 at 19:37

The below seems to work. The enter event handles the tabbing to the control and the MouseDown works when the control is clicked.

    private ########### void textBox1_Enter(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        textBox1.SelectAll();
    }

    private void textBox1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        if (textBox1.Focused)
            textBox1.SelectAll();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
No luck, doesn't work I'm afraid. Try selecting some text. The .SelectAll text overwrites what the user is trying to select. –  Judah Himango Sep 18 '08 at 22:51

I know this was already solved but I have a suggestion that I think is actually rather simple.

In the mouse up event all you have to do is place

if(textBox.SelectionLength = 0)
{
    textBox.SelectAll();
}

It seems to work for me in VB.NET (I know this is a C# question... sadly I'm forced to use VB at my job.. and I was having this issue, which is what brought me here...)

I haven't found any problems with it yet.. except for the fact that it doesn't immediately select on click, but I was having problems with that....

share|improve this answer
1  
The original request wanted this to work when you tab into the field as well. –  Don Kirkby Jan 13 '12 at 17:24
1  
Yep, this doesn't work for all the scenarios. It only works when you click into the textbox. And even then, if doesn't behave as a browser address bar behaves when selection already exists in the text box. –  Judah Himango Jan 16 '12 at 19:41

The following solution works for me. I added OnKeyDown and OnKeyUp event override to keep the TextBox text always selected.

    public class NumericTextBox : TextBox
{
    private bool _focused;
    protected override void OnGotFocus(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnGotFocus(e);
        if (MouseButtons == MouseButtons.None)
        {
            this.SelectAll();
            _focused = true;
        }
    }
    protected override void OnEnter(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnEnter(e);
        if (MouseButtons == MouseButtons.None)
        {
            SelectAll();
            _focused = true;
        }
    }

    protected override void OnLeave(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnLeave(e);
        _focused = false;
    }

    protected override void OnMouseUp(MouseEventArgs mevent)
    {
        base.OnMouseUp(mevent);
        if (!_focused)
        {
            if (SelectionLength == 0)
                SelectAll();
            _focused = true;
        }
    }

    protected override void OnKeyUp(KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnKeyUp(e);

        if (SelectionLength == 0)
            SelectAll();
        _focused = true;
    }
    protected override void OnKeyDown(KeyEventArgs e)
    {
       base.OnKeyDown(e);
       if (SelectionLength == 0)
            SelectAll();
        _focused = true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Does it allow you to mouse down into the textbox, drag your cursor to select some text, then mouse up? –  Judah Himango Aug 31 '12 at 14:10

Set the selction when you leave the control. It will be there when you get back. Tab around the form and when you return to the control, all the text will be selected.

If you go in by mouse, then the caret will rightly be placed at the point where you clicked.

private void maskedTextBox1_Leave(object sender, CancelEventArgs e)
    {
        maskedTextBox1.SelectAll();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
If you go in by mouse, it should select all text, unless it's already focused. This does not support that. –  Judah Himango Jun 20 '13 at 18:55

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