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I have recently tried to find a good source on the difference between monads and monoids. Could someone provide a link to a good resource on this or perhaps take one's time to elaborate on the similarities/differences?

Thanks a lot in advance.

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There is so much content about monads & monoids that i guess everybody has its own "good source". My triade is : this SO question, Monads Are Not Metaphors by Daniel Spiewak and Monads are Dominoes by Rúnar Óli –  blouerat Mar 17 '12 at 0:21
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I enjoyed learnyouahaskell.com. –  schmmd Mar 17 '12 at 1:23
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@blouerat amusing that you recommend both "Monads are not metaphors" and "Monads are Dominoes", though the very titles seem to contradict each other :) –  Dan Burton Mar 17 '12 at 4:59
    
@DanBurton haha yes! Didn't even notice. Despite the title "Monads are Dominoes", the article starts by "However, instead of explaining monads in terms of a cute metaphor about dominoes, I’m just going to throw you into the deep end. Deep breath!". So yes, the contradiction is just in the title. –  blouerat Mar 17 '12 at 15:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Monads are monoids in the category of endofunctors. Therefore, a monad is just one example of monoid, which is a more general concept.

And, though that might be technically true, the most simple answer is that monads and monoids are really nothing like each other, and you shouldn't be trying to learn the difference between them, but just learn them. There's ton of material about it on the internet, easily googled.

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I surprises (and intimidates) me how mathematically relatively related ideas can turn out to be radically different in all practical terms when applied to programming languages. –  Erik Allik Feb 25 at 19:12

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