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Consider the following:

class Example : boost::noncopyable
{
    HANDLE hExample;
public:
    Example()
    {
        hExample = InitializeHandle();
    }
    ~Example()
    {
        if (hExample == INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            return;
        }
        FreeHandle(hExample);
    }
    Example(Example && other)
        : hExample(other.hExample)
    {
        other.hExample = INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE;
    }
    Example& operator=(Example &&other)
    {
        std::swap(hExample, other.hExample); //?
        return *this;
    }
};

My thinking here is that the destructor will be running on "other" shortly, and as such I don't have to implement my destructor logic again in the move assignment operator by using swap. But I'm not sure that's a reasonable assumption. Would this be "okay"?

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See this answer to Why do some people use swap for move assignments –  Bo Persson Mar 17 '12 at 8:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It should be ok, but it's scarcely any better than the recommended technique of pass-by-value, in which case the move constructor would be used in this situation.

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The copy and swap idiom is still normal for move assignment operators? –  Billy ONeal Mar 17 '12 at 2:40
    
@Billy: Yes, you get both move and copy operators for free with copy-and-swap. –  Puppy Mar 17 '12 at 2:41
1  
@DeadMG: "Free" is a relative term. You get a copy-and-move for copy assignment. So if the object isn't really "moveable" (just regular data without pointers), it costs as much as two copies. –  Nicol Bolas Mar 17 '12 at 3:06
    
@Nicol: One copy is to initialize the parameter. Where's the other? –  Ben Voigt Mar 17 '12 at 3:25
2  
@Ben : Inside the swap. –  ildjarn Mar 17 '12 at 3:29

Imagine the following:

// global variables
Example foo;

struct bar {
    void f() {
        x = std::move(foo); // the old x will now live forever
    }
    Example x;
}

A similar idiom, copy-and-swap (or in this case, move-and-swap), ensures that the destructor is run immediately, which I believe is a better semantic.

Example& operator=(Example other) // other will be moved here
{
    std::swap(hExample, other.hExample);
    return *this;
} // and destroyed here, after swapping
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Wouldn't this allow someone to accidentally "move" away the object they're working with? This object is not copyable because I don't have a good way of copying the "handle" -- which is why I'm supporting move only. –  Billy ONeal Mar 17 '12 at 2:41
2  
If the object is not movable a compiler error will be generated when the compiler attempts a copy. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 17 '12 at 2:42
    
Sorry, I meant "If the object is not copyable" in the last comment. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 17 '12 at 2:48
1  
@Nicol : Ah, I (very much) misunderstood. This counts as both copy and move assignment operator; if one were to try to define either in addition to this, any calls would be ambiguous. –  ildjarn Mar 17 '12 at 3:09
1  
@ildjarn std::is_move_assignable tests if x = y where y is an rvalue reference is valid, so that's not a problem. I think really there's nothing this affects. It's just weird that technically you can create a move-only class with a copy assignment operator and no move assignment operator, and assignment will have the proper move semantics, not copy. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 17 '12 at 4:01

My thinking here is that the destructor will be running on "other" shortly

Then your thinking is flawed. You can move from any object you have non-const access to. And the object can continue to live indefinitely after this.

It is technically correct to put your current data in the old object. But it's not a good idea. It's better to use a stack variable:

Example& operator=(Example &&other)
{
    Example temp(std::move(other));  //other is now empty.
    std::swap(hExample, temp);       //our stuff is in `temp`, and will be destroyed
    return *thisl
}

Or better yet (if you're not using Visual Studio) store your stuff in a wrapper that supports movement correctly, and let the compiler-generated move constructor do the job for you.

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This is silly. If you want a copy, use pass-by-value which makes the copy (but allows additional optimization opportunities). And doesn't proliferate implementations depending on whether the operand is an xvalue or not. –  Ben Voigt Mar 17 '12 at 2:38
    
@Ben: But if you use pass by value, then someone would be able to pass an lvalue into the operator (it becomes a copy assignment operator) instead. This object is noncopyable. –  Billy ONeal Mar 17 '12 at 2:42
    
@BenVoigt: Even if it wasn't non-copyable, a copy would be it's own separate thing. His situation needs move semantics anyways since the class manages a resource. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Mar 17 '12 at 2:43
    
@Billy: If there's no copy constructor, then pass by value will not accept an lvalue. –  Ben Voigt Mar 17 '12 at 2:46
2  
@Billy : Partial C++11 support is a bitch. :-P –  ildjarn Mar 17 '12 at 3:12

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