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There is a restriction on the syntax of attribute access, in Python (at least in the CPython 2.7.2 implementation):

>>> class C(object): pass
>>> o = C()
>>> o.x = 123  # Works
>>> o.if = 123
    o.if = 123
       ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

My question is twofold:

  1. Is there a fundamental reason why using Python keyword attribute names (as in o.if = 123) is forbidden?
  2. Is/where is the above restriction on attribute names documented?

It would make sense to do o.class = …, in one of my programs, and I am a little disappointed not to be able to do it (o.class_ would work, but it does not look as simple).

PS: The problem is obviously that if and class are Python keywords. The question is why using keywords as attribute names would be forbidden (I don't see any ambiguity in the expression o.class = 123), and whether this is documented.

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3  
Because parser is simpler when keywords are always keywords, and not contextual. So the code doesn't even get to the point where there's attribute access, it's simply a syntax error on the parsing level (because if is part of the grammar and it never appears in this place). It's the same in most languages, and language grammar is the documentation for that. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 17 '12 at 3:33
2  
Also, cls is usually used for names holding references to classes. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 17 '12 at 3:34
    
Even if you have a parser that's can distinguish keywords from variables/function names, it's no guarantee that one might shadow the other in a corner case. It's much easier to maintain sanity if you just straight-out forbid the use of a few dozen names. –  Li-aung Yip Mar 17 '12 at 3:39
    
@CatPlusPlus: Nice answer. Simply a design decision for efficiency of the parser. Python idiom is if_, while_, exec_, etc for keyword name conflicts. _foo is considered a pattern for protected attributes –  jdi Mar 17 '12 at 3:40
1  
@CatPlusPlus: answer, not comment. You've actually answered it while the present answers don't answer at all. –  Chris Morgan Mar 17 '12 at 4:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because parser is simpler when keywords are always keywords, and not contextual (e.g. if is a keyword when on the statement level, but just an identifier when inside an expression — for if it'd be double hard because of X if C else Y, and for is used in list comprehensions and generator expressions).

So the code doesn't even get to the point where there's attribute access, it's simply rejected by the parser, just like incorrect indentation (which is why it's a SyntaxError, and not AttributeError or something). It doesn't differentiate whether you use if as an attribute name, a variable name, a function name, or a type name. It can never be an identifier, simply because parser always assigns it "keyword" label and makes it a different token than identifiers.

It's the same in most languages, and language grammar (+ lexer specification) is the documentation for that. Language spec mentions it explicitly. It also doesn't change in Python 3.

Also, just because you can use setattr or __dict__ to make an attribute with a reserved name, doesn't mean you should. Don't force yourself/API user to use getattr instead of natural attribute access. getattr should be reserved for when access to a variable attribute name is needed.

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1  
So it is how teacher tell us in compiler classes. This is how compilers are classically built. Tokens are split, classified into categories, and then analyzed if they make sense by the parser. Every special symbol like + or : has its own (unitary) category, as well as every reserved word ("if", "or", "class", "def", etc). Every other word belongs to a special category: the identifiers. Since "if" is not an identifier, it can not name an attribute, simple as that. I am not saying it is impossible to build a compiler/code analyzer in some other way, just this is how things are done these days... –  lvella Mar 17 '12 at 4:39
    
@Ivella: +1 for the very relevant comment. –  EOL Mar 17 '12 at 4:46
    
@CatPlusPlus: Agreed, about getattr and __dict__. I was just mentioning these because they show that attributes names can be keywords even though the usual object.attribute syntax forbids it. –  EOL Mar 17 '12 at 4:48
    
@EOL: It again comes down to syntax. 'if' is always a string literal, and never a keyword. And since attributes are kept in dicts, any string will do. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 17 '12 at 4:58

I don't think if can be used as a variable name or an attribute (explicitly), as it is a keyword.

You can, however, use setattr and getattr to get around this in a messy manner

>>> class C(object): pass
... 
>>> o = C()
>>> setattr(o, 'if', 123)
>>> getattr(o, 'if')
123
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Yes, indeed. This looks even nicer than accessing o.__dict__. However, the question is about what the reasons for this restriction are, and whether the restriction is documented. –  EOL Mar 17 '12 at 3:29
    
The reason is because you can't override keywords. That doesn't need to be documented. –  Blender Mar 17 '12 at 3:29
    
I like @Cat Plus Plus's answer in the main comments. It was a design decision to make the parser easier. The python idiom is to do if_, or exec_, etc –  jdi Mar 17 '12 at 3:39
    
@Blender: Can you explain how o.if = 123 would override if? it very much looks like attribute value setting, not variable setting. –  EOL Mar 17 '12 at 4:43
    
It doesn't. When the parser parses, it expects an if keyword to denote an if block, which it doesn't in that context. –  Blender Mar 17 '12 at 6:53

Because if is a keyword. You have similar issues with o.while and o.for:

pax> python
>>> class C(object): pass
... 

>>> o = C()

>>> o.not_a_keyword = 123

>>> o.if = 123
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    o.if = 123
       ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

>>> o.while = 123
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    o.while = 123
          ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

>>> o.for = 123
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    o.for = 123
        ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax

Other keywords in Python can be obtained with:

>>> import keyword
>>> keyword.kwlist
['and', 'as', 'assert', 'break', 'class', 'continue', 'def',
 'del', 'elif', 'else', 'except', 'exec', 'finally', 'for',
 'from', 'global', 'if', 'import', 'in', 'is', 'lambda',
 'not', 'or', 'pass', 'print', 'raise', 'return', 'try',
 'while', 'with', 'yield']

You should not generally use a keyword as variable name in Python.

I would suggest choosing a more descriptive name, such as iface if it's an interface, or infld for an input field and so forth.

As to your question edit as to why keywords aren't allowed, it simplifies parsers greatly if the lexical elements are context free. Having to treat the lexical token if as a keyword in some places and an identifier in others would introduce complexity that's not really needed if you choose your identifiers more wisely.

For example, the C++ statement:

long int int = char[new - int];

could (with a little difficulty) be evaluated with a complex parser based on where those lexical elements occur (and what exists on either side of them). But, (at least partially) in the interests of simplicity (and readability), this is not done.

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Yes, indeed. I updated the title of the question so as to make explicit the fact that the question is why keywords would be forbidden as attribute names. In fact, in o.class = 123, it is obvious that class should be an attribute name; however, this is not valid (C)Python; there must be good reasons why this should not be obvious to the CPython interpreter: what are these reasons? –  EOL Mar 17 '12 at 3:31

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