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I asked a question earlier, but I don't think I was clear enough about the sort of answers I was hoping for, so let me provide a more concrete example:

class Program
{
    private static bool State;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        State = false;
        Console.WriteLine(And());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static bool And()
    {
        return Or() && C();
    }

    static bool Or()
    {
        return A() || AB();
    }

    static bool C()
    {
        return State;
    }

    static bool A()
    {
        return true;
    }

    static bool AB()
    {
        State = true;
        return true;
    }
}

The flow of this program looks like:

  1. And() gets called
  2. And() calls Or()
  3. Or() calls A()
  4. A() returns true
  5. Flow returns to Or(), which returns true (lazy evaluation)
  6. Flow returns to And(), And() calls C()
  7. C() returns false
  8. Flow returns to And(), which returns false

Now if Or() did not perform lazy evaluation (I change || to |), the program will return true. However, I don't want AB() to executed unless the result of the entire parse fails (And() returns false).

So what I'd like to do, is somewhere in the Or() function, save the current state on a stack (static variable) so that if And() returns false, I can pop an item off the stack and try the alternative.

How would I accomplish this in C#?

share|improve this question
    
Personally, I would just using something like GPPG and be done with it. – leppie Mar 17 '12 at 3:37
    
This is not possible in C#, you cannot capture the cpu call stack and restore it later. – Hans Passant Mar 17 '12 at 3:49
    
@leppie: Gardens Point Parser Generator? I'll look into it, but I'd still like to do this as a learning exercise. – mpen Mar 17 '12 at 4:11
    
@HansPassant: How do we work around that fact then? – mpen Mar 17 '12 at 4:12
    
Creating parsers is quite possible in C#, just not the way you envision it. Nor is this restriction unique to C#, you can't do it in C++ either. You got excellent answers in your previous question. – Hans Passant Mar 17 '12 at 4:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It strikes me as being fairly trivial- just rearrange the calls:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    State = false;
    Console.WriteLine(Or());
    Console.ReadLine();
}

static bool Or()
{
    return A() && C() || AB() && C();
}

Or am I missing something? Maybe C() has side effects such that it should not be called twice?

EDIT: Now I understand what you are trying to do. Do yourself a favor. Listen to the suggestions you've gotten, get a copy of GPPG, or (probably much simpler) ANTLR, with ANTLRWorks. It is so, so much easier and less error prone than attempting to roll a parser by hand, and you still get C# at the end.

share|improve this answer
    
C() is allowed to be called twice. It would have to be; we have to call it once to determine if we should backtrack and call AB(). It's trivial to do by hand here...but is there a programmatic way of re-arranging these function calls like this? – mpen Mar 17 '12 at 4:10
    
Programmatic given what as input and output? An expression tree? A chain of delegates? Some chained Tasks? I think that's the trouble you are running into with this question- you have some concrete use case in mind and are attempting to make it too abstract in asking the question. If you can provide a concrete, runnable program like the above that actually reproduces the problem you are encountering, rather than approximating it, then we can answer it. – Chris Shain Mar 17 '12 at 4:13
    
Fine, I'll post the full program and what I have so far, but when people post too much code people tend to get scared off. – mpen Mar 17 '12 at 4:15
    
I'm not necessarily asking for the full source- just a small truly representative example of the problem- tell me what I can and can't change. – Chris Shain Mar 17 '12 at 4:19
    
Updated question. You can change just about anything in the library, but I want to keep the grammar (in main) very simple, as I have it. Also, I want to be able to add new types of nodes easily; so we can make Term more complex, but the extensions should be pretty light. – mpen Mar 17 '12 at 4:20

The problem has nothing to do with the || operator. The problem is that you forgot to backtrack on a failed Parse. If Parse returns false, you need to restore i and any other state variables to their original value so the next parser can give it a try. C# is not a goal-seeking language. If you want backtracking you will have to do it yourself. (Or switch to a language with backtracking, like Prolog.)

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't forget; I know I need to backtrack, I just don't know how to backtrack. Restoring i is easy, it's the rest of the state that's tricky. – mpen Mar 17 '12 at 17:30
    
I spent 45 minutes learning how your program works and then debugging it. Once you restore i on a failed parse, the program works fine. It correctly stops parsing after character 10 because your definition of literal includes an open-brace. – Raymond Chen Mar 18 '12 at 15:48
    
Can you post your modifications? It shouldn't get past the first character, because the definition of item says to try a kvp first, and then it can't find the : and gives up, rather than trying to alternate option, a literal. And even if that part worked... I didn't think literal needed to exclude the opening brace, because the one before e should have been read in by dict already... – mpen Mar 18 '12 at 17:06
    
dict never got a chance because your value rule says to try key before dict, and key accepts a literal. All I did was update the ref i parameter only on a successful parse. – Raymond Chen Mar 18 '12 at 17:27
    
Aha...you're right! What do you mean by "only update ref i on a successful parse though? StringTerm and RegexTerm already did that..? – mpen Mar 18 '12 at 17:33

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