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I've been working with Jetty's Continuations API and just figured out a very frustrating bug (* at least I think this was the reason*).

If I had read more closely, I would have seen this:

The timeout should be set before the suspend, by a call to continuation.setTimeout(long); if no timeout is set, then the default period is used.

So in my code, I was simply suspending a continuation without setting a timeout. When I read this in the documentation...

A timeout of <=0 means the continuation will never expire.

... and then tried setting the timeout to something negative, things started working (* at least it seems so *).

Unfortunately, I haven't been able to figure out what the "default period" is for a timeout. Where can I find this out?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I guess I figured this out while stepping through the debugger... the default time period is 30 seconds. I found the source code...

http://www.jarvana.com/jarvana/view/org/eclipse/jetty/aggregate/jetty-all/8.0.4.v20111024/jetty-all-8.0.4.v20111024-sources.jar!/org/eclipse/jetty/continuation/FauxContinuation.java?format=ok

... and it seems like this FauxContinuation implementation of a Continuation was being constructed and the timeout is initialized to 30 seconds.

private long _timeoutMs = 30000;
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2  
yes, default timeout on continuations is 30s, and it might be easier to go straight to the source instead of rooting around jar services like that: git.eclipse.org/c/jetty/org.eclipse.jetty.project.git/tree – jesse mcconnell Mar 17 '12 at 11:45
    
very cool, thanks for showing me that – Hristo Mar 17 '12 at 16:40

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