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The following code is a simplification of a code in a real application. The problem below is that a long work will be ran in the UI thread, instead of a background thread.

    void Do()
    {
        Debug.Assert(this.Dispatcher.CheckAccess() == true);
        Task.Factory.StartNew(ShortUIWork, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.None, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
    }

    void ShortUIWork()
    {
        Debug.Assert(this.Dispatcher.CheckAccess() == true);
        Task.Factory.StartNew(LongWork, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    }

    void LongWork()
    {
        Debug.Assert(this.Dispatcher.CheckAccess() == false);
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }

So Do() is called normally from UI context. And so is ShortUIWork, as defined by the TaskScheduler. However, LongWork ends up called also in UI thread, which, of course, blocks the UI.

How to ensure that a task is not ran in the UI thread?

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tasks create a threads that will not run on UI by definition. Are you sure that LongWork blocks UI thread? –  Tigran Mar 17 '12 at 7:55
1  
@Tigran: TPL uses background threads by default, not by definition. –  user180326 Mar 17 '12 at 9:43
1  
Code that doesn't repro the problem doesn't help. A common reason for behavior like this is a wrapper class for a COM component. COM keeps objects of classes that advertize themselves to not support any kind of threading safe by automatically marshaling any calls back to the thread that created them. –  Hans Passant Mar 17 '12 at 9:44
    
The code repros the problem for me. –  Kent Boogaart Mar 17 '12 at 9:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

LongRunning is merely a hint to the TaskScheduler. In the case of the SynchronizationContextTaskScheduler (as returned by TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()), it apparently ignores the hint.

On the one hand this seems counterintuitive. After all, if the task is long running, it's unlikely you want it to run on the UI thread. On the other hand, according to MSDN:

LongRunning - Specifies that a task will be a long-running, coarse-grained operation. It provides a hint to the TaskScheduler that oversubscription may be warranted.

Since the UI thread isn't a thread pool thread, no "oversubscription" (thread pool starvation) can occur, so it somewhat makes sense that the hint will have no effect for the SynchronizationContextTaskScheduler.

Regardless, you can work around the issue by switching back to the default task scheduler:

void ShortUIWork()
{
    Debug.Assert(this.Dispatcher.CheckAccess() == true);
    Task.Factory.StartNew(LongWork, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning, TaskScheduler.Default);
}
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Why does the Debug.Assert(this.Dispatcher.CheckAccess() == false); in LongWork pass, even though it is executed on the UI thread? –  Branko Dimitrijevic Mar 17 '12 at 12:04
    
@Branko: I don't follow. LongWork doesn't execute on the UI thread if the code is changed as per my answer. That's why the assertion passes (but fails with the original code). –  Kent Boogaart Mar 17 '12 at 13:01
    
Strange, I could have sworn that it passed when I originally debugged it but it fails now (in the original code). Either I've hit some strange debugger interaction (whatever that might be) or this is just a brain failure on my part ;) My apologies. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Mar 17 '12 at 13:10
    
Thanks, using TaskScheduler.Default indeed fixes the issue. However, this is a bit worrying. Basically, if you work with WPF, you should use TaskScheduler.Default for all work that you don't want to be ran in the UI thread, just to be sure that your Task won't accidentally block the UI thread. –  Tomba Mar 17 '12 at 14:57
1  
@Tomba: I think your use case is a little unusual. Normally, you would just use the default task scheduler to do the work, then switch back to the UI task scheduler once the work is done. If you have a small amount of work to do on the UI thread first, why use a task for that work at all? You could instead just do it inline and then kick off the task for the long-running work. –  Kent Boogaart Mar 17 '12 at 17:32

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