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When I create a table with a timestamp column, that column is magically defined as NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. Ignoring how weird this is so far, I would like to change it to have no default and no special "on update" behavior.

I found that if I change the column to be NULL, the default is magically set to NULL and the "on update" magically disappears. This is great, however I would like the column to be NOT NULL. When I change it back, both the default and "on update" (set to CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) magically reappear.

I know I could use datetime instead of timestamp, but I'm interested in timestamp because it is timezone-aware (seems to be like "timestamp with time zone" in Postgres).

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2 Answers 2

Timestamp columns are a special case. See here: By default, TIMESTAMP columns are NOT NULL, cannot contain NULL values, and assigning NULL assigns the current timestamp.

For more detailed information read up on Data Type Default Values.

Specifically that situation applies when not running in strict mode. If running in strict mode, inserting a NULL will throw an error.

This should take care of it:

ALTER TABLE tableName ALTER COLUMN columnName DROP DEFAULT;

If that doesn't work, doing this is supposed to leave you with the default (easily overwritten) but remove the ON UPDATE:

ALTER TABLE tableName CHANGE columnName columnName NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP;

Note the repeated column name.

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1  
Hmm, interesting. I was able to do this: alter table tstest modify ts timestamp not null default 0; and afterwards: alter table tstest alter column ts drop default; That seems to give the results I wanted. I wonder if there's a more direct way, ideally in the create table statement. –  aditsu Mar 17 '12 at 10:07
    
Glad to hear it worked! –  Ilion Mar 17 '12 at 10:08
    
So for now I can do it in 2 steps: create table (with default 0) and then drop default. But the weird thing is if I try to insert a null value, it still uses the current timestamp (and if I don't specify a value, it uses 0). mysql, y u no make sense? –  aditsu Mar 17 '12 at 10:29
    
It appears to be a special case. See here: By default, TIMESTAMP columns are NOT NULL, cannot contain NULL values, and assigning NULL assigns the current timestamp. –  Ilion Mar 17 '12 at 10:40
    
Also it sounds like you are not running in strict mode. See this to really understand what's going on: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/data-type-defaults.html –  Ilion Mar 17 '12 at 10:44

Not long ago I found a really nice solution that may help you. Disable ON UPDATE

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