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#include <string.h>
#include <memcopy.h>
#include <pagecopy.h>

#undef memcpy

void *
memcpy (dstpp, srcpp, len)
 void *dstpp;
 const void *srcpp;
 size_t len;
{
  unsigned long int dstp = (long int) dstpp;
  unsigned long int srcp = (long int) srcpp;
  ...

This is our familiar lib function memcpy's implementation, but I don't recognize its signature and I've never seen it before. Can anyone tell me what it is?

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which architecture employs this module? If you've looking besides x86 support, you may find a lot of code looking weird. –  kagali-san Mar 17 '12 at 11:01
    
x86 I think. This signature was found in glibc-2.4. –  Ivan Jobs Mar 17 '12 at 11:54
    
thank you kagali-san, –  Ivan Jobs Mar 17 '12 at 11:54
    
'thank you' for what, did you found something architecture-related? I will try to look into problem in newer glibc-2.14 –  kagali-san Mar 18 '12 at 3:42
    
thank you for your reply. no, I didn't find anything architecture related. –  Ivan Jobs Mar 18 '12 at 14:29

1 Answer 1

This is our familiar lib function memcpy's implementation, but I don't recognize its signature

Which aspect of it don't you recognize? Is it the fact that it is written in K&R (pre-ANSI) C, or something else? Would you have recognized it if it was written that way instead:

void *
memcpy(void *dstpp, const void *srcpp, size_t len)
{
  ...

}
share|improve this answer
    
yes, it is the fact that it is written in K&R C. Thank you. Why this signature is still in use? so weird. –  Ivan Jobs Mar 28 '12 at 1:16
1  
Because some people think it's more "compatible" or "portable" to keep around constructs that were deprecated 20 years ago and later removed from the language than to use proper C, despite the fact that there's no pre-ANSI compiler with any hope of compiling the majority of the code in glibc. –  R.. May 26 '12 at 4:14

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