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From an answer on Inheritance: why is there a difference in behaviour between inherited and supplied variables?, I understand that the below code prints 0 because there is only one copy of x.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class A {
    public:
        int x;
        A() { x = 10; }
};

class B : public A {
    public:
        B() { x = 0; }
};

int main() {
    A* ab = new B;
    cout << ab->x << endl; // prints 0
}

But does this not go against the very meaning of inheritance?

I coded class B to interit publicly from class A, and I expected it to inherit a copy of member variable x, which should have resulted in ab->x printing value 10.

What am I missing here? I am finding it too difficult to understand why this prints 0 despite inheritance.

share|improve this question
    
It prints 0 because you set x to 0 in the constructor. I honestly don't understand the question. –  sepp2k Mar 17 '12 at 14:50
    
@sepp2k: ab is of type class A. class A's x was only set to 10, and not to 0. –  Lazer Mar 17 '12 at 14:56
    
@sepp2k: I guess the OP thinks that the x that you access in B is different from the x in A, which is not the case. –  Philipp Mar 17 '12 at 14:56
1  
@Lazer No, ab is of type A *. An the object is points to is actually of type B. –  delnan Mar 17 '12 at 15:00
    
@delnan: yes I understand that. But I dont think that is related to my doubt here. I guess inheritance does not result in a new variable copy, that was what I was missing. –  Lazer Mar 17 '12 at 15:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a simple figure that briefly explains inheritance in terms of member variables:

enter image description here

When the ChildClass is created, the BaseClass is created and exists inside the ChildClass. Variables a, b and c can be accessed from both ChildClass and Baseclass (depending on access modifiers such as public, private and protected). They're shared, not copied.

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So, the BaseClass members in your example are shared, but it does exist as an independent class (in the sense that a BaseClass* can still point to it, and be unaware of existence of ChildClass). Interesting, and thanks! –  Lazer Mar 17 '12 at 15:32
    
@Lazer You've got it :) –  unexplored Mar 17 '12 at 15:42
1  
Yes. However, you cannot point to a class, only to an object (an instance of the class). –  Mr Lister Mar 17 '12 at 15:42

I expected it to inherit a copy of member variable x

No, you don't inherit by copying. B inheriting A results in every object of B containing a subobject of type A. Since x is defined in A, you modify the A subobject by assigning to x.

The following reformulation of the code makes this subobject visible:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

struct A {
  int x;
  A() { x = 10; }
};

struct B {
  A subobject;
  B(): subobject() { this->subobject.x = 0; }
};

int main() {
  B* ab = new B;
  cout << ab->subobject.x << endl; // prints 0
}

This is of course not identical to inheritance since the types A and B are now not related any more (you cannot convert from B to A), but it is somewhat analogous to what the compiler sees when you use inheritance.

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B inherits x from A (with the value 10 set in A's constructor), but then immediately sets it to 0 in its own constuctor.

There is only one x shared by A and B.

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inherit a copy of member variable x - well, it doesn't inherit a copy, it just inherits the variable. and it did.

First the constructor of A runs (x=10), the the constructor of B (x=0). After that, x is obviously 0.

Based on your comment, I think your looking for composition and not inheritance:

class B {
   public:
     A a;
     int x;
};
share|improve this answer
    
but class A's copy of x is still 10 –  Lazer Mar 17 '12 at 14:57
    
there's only one x. and, again, no copying. check update. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 17 '12 at 14:58
    
@Lazer There are no member variables in a class, only in instantiated objects of the class! And in this case, there is only one object, hence, only one x. –  Mr Lister Mar 17 '12 at 15:35

Or to put it another way, there is no implicit 0-ness or 10-ness to the member x. What happens, happens because you call the constructor of B with the new call. Whether the x is defined in A or in B or as a global variable, doesn't matter. The constructor of B sets it to 0, so it is 0.

Does this help?

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It does matter, because if it was redefined in B, the value printed would have been 10. –  Lazer Mar 17 '12 at 15:26
    
Then the question would have been utterly different! I was trying to explain that it doesn't matter where x is defined. I was not saying it doesn't matter how many xs you have. –  Mr Lister Mar 17 '12 at 15:38

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