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The following Python code executes normally without raising an exception:

class Foo:
    pass

class Foo:
    pass

def bar():
    pass

def bar():
    pass

print(Foo.__module__ + Foo.__name__)

Yet clearly, there are multiple instances of __main__.Foo and __main__.bar. Why does Python not raise an error when it encounters this namespace collision? And since it doesn't raise an error, what exactly is it doing? Is the first class __main__.Foo replaced by the second class __main__.Foo?

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to assign a variable twice is wrong? –  JBernardo Mar 17 '12 at 14:59
    
But isn't it doing more than assigning a variable? It's creating new types with each new class definition. –  Channel72 Mar 17 '12 at 15:00
    
So what? It's creating the second class object, and then it assigns the name/"variable" Foo to refer to that class object instead of what it referred to previously. Modules are a sequence of statements (mostly like functions), and class/def are merely statements. –  delnan Mar 17 '12 at 15:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In Python everything is an object - instance of some type. E.g. 1 is an instance of type int, def foo(): pass creates object foo which is an instance of type function (same for classes - objects, created by class statement are instances of type type). Given this, there no difference (at the level of name binding mechanism) between

class Foo:
  string = "foo1"

class Foo:
  string = "foo2"

and

a = 1
a = 2

BTW, class definition may be performed using type function (yeah, there is type type and built-in function type):

Foo = type('Foo', (), {string: 'foo1'})

So classes and functions are not some different kind of data, although special syntax may be used for creating their instances.

See also related Data Model section.

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The Foo class is effectively being re-defined further down the script (script is read by the interpreter from top to bottom).

class Foo:
  string = "foo1"

class Foo:
  string = "foo2"

f = Foo()
print f.string

prints "foo2"

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The second definition replaces the first one, as expected if you think at classes as elements in the "types dictionary" of the current namespace:

>>> class Foo:
...     def test1(self):
...             print "test1"
... 
>>> Foo
<class __main__.Foo at 0x7fe8c6943650>
>>> class Foo:
...     def test2(self):
...             print "test2"
... 
>>> Foo
<class __main__.Foo at 0x7fe8c6943590>
>>> a = Foo()
>>> a.test1()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Foo instance has no attribute 'test1'
>>> a.test2()
test2
>>> 

here you can clearly see that the "definition" of Foo changes (Foo points to different classes in memory), and that it's the last one that prevails.

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Conceptually this is just rebinding a name. It's no different from this:

x = 1
x = 2

and I'm sure you would not want that to be an error.

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In compiled and some interpreted languages there is a clear seperation between definition, declaration and execution. But in python it's simpler. There are just statements!

Python EXECUTES your script/program/module as soon as it is invoked. It may help, to see def and class as "syntactic sugar". E.g. class is a convenient wrapper around Foo = type("class-name", (bases), {attributes}).

So python executes:

class Foo  #equivalent to: Foo = type("class-name", (bases), {attributes})
class Foo
def bar
def bar

print(Foo.__module__ + Foo.__name__)

which boils down to overwriting the names Fooand bar with the latest "declaration". So this just works as intended from a python-pov - but maybe not as you intended it! ;-)

so it's also a typical error for developers with a different background to misunderstand:

def some_method(default_list = []):
    ...

default_list is a singleton here. Every call to some_method usese the same default_list, because the list-object is created at first execution.

Python doesn't enter the function-body, but only executes the signature/head as soon as it begins parsing.

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