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I am wondering whether the static method java.lang.Math.max(int a, int b) is thread safe?

If it is not thread safe, could you explain the situation where this method gives wrong output due to concurrent access of to multiple threads, with a piece of code?

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7  
You have over 30 questions without an accepted answer. +1 for asking an answerable question. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 17 '12 at 15:15
    
@PeterLawrey but not a real question, so -1. –  EJP Mar 18 '12 at 21:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You only get thread safety issues from concurrent access of shared state where at least one thread modifies the state.

Math.max(a, b) doesn't have any state, shared or otherwise so its thread safe.

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What you exactly mean by "state"? You mean static method? Then all static methods become thread safe?! :-) –  DUKE Mar 17 '12 at 16:14
4  
By state, I mean something which can change from one state to another. e.g. c = 0 and later it is c = 5. In Java terms there has to be fields which are changed. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 17 '12 at 16:18
2  
Or a database query, or filesystem access. That counts as state, too. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 17 '12 at 21:07

It's thread safe, why wouldn't it be? It has no state, there are no objects being modified when you call it. The method is just an if statement:

public static int max(int a, int b) {
    return (a >= b) ? a : b;
}
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What you exactly mean by "state"? You mean static method? Then all static methods become thread safe?! :-) –  DUKE Mar 17 '12 at 16:15

Math.max is completely stateless, so it is totally thread safe.

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What you exactly mean by "state"? You mean static method? Then all static methods become thread safe?! :-) –  DUKE Mar 17 '12 at 16:15
1  
A method is stateless if it will always, no matter what, return the same output on the same input. –  Louis Wasserman Mar 17 '12 at 20:16
1  
@Louis: Not necessarily, a method can write to a file (which is not thread-safe) while returning 0 for any input. –  danielkza Mar 24 '12 at 4:38
    
Ew, point taken. It's so much easier to describe in Haskell when you can't do anything stateful without marking it as in the IO monad... –  Louis Wasserman Mar 24 '12 at 10:47

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