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I'd like to know the most efficient SQL query for achieving this problem:

Say we have a table with two columns, one storing entry ids (entry_id) and one storing category ids (cat_id):

 entry_id       cat_id
 3              1
 3              2
 3              3
 3              20
 4              1
 4              2
 4              21

I'd like to count how many distinct entry_id's there are in the categories 1, 2 OR 3 but that also must be in cat_id 20.

For example, categories 1, 2 and 3 might represent music genres (Country, Pop etc.), while category 20 might be recording formats (CD, Vinyl etc.). So another way of putting it verbally could be: "How many products are there that are on Vinyl and in either the Pop or Country category?"

I could achieve this with a nested loop in code (PHP) or possibly with a nested SQL subquery, but neither feels that efficient. I feel there must be an obvious answer to this staring me in the face...

EDIT TO ADD:
I would also like to do this without modifying the database design, as it's a third party system.

FURTHER EXAMPLE TO CLARIFY:
Another real-world example of why I'd need this data:

Let's say the category ids instead represent either:

  • Accommodation Types (Camping = 20, Holiday Cottage = 21)

OR

  • Continents and their sub-regions (i.e. Europe = 1, UK = 2, England = 3)

Let's say someone has selected that they are interested in camping (cat_id = 1). Now we need to count how many camping products there are in the Europe. A product might be tagged as both Europe (parent), UK (child) AND England (grand-child), giving us an array of category ids 1, 2 or 3. So we now need to count how many distinct products there are in both those categories AND the original accommodation category of 1 (camping).

So having selected Camping, the end result might look something like:

  • Europe: 4 camping products
    • UK: 2 camping products
      • England : 1 camping product
      • Wales : 1 camping product
    • France: 2 camping products etc.

Hope that helps...

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considered adding a format column? –  joakimdahlstrom Mar 17 '12 at 15:28
    
It's a good idea, but I need to do this without modifying the table structure. Sorry, I should have included this in the OP. I've added this info now. –  Oskar Smith Mar 17 '12 at 15:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe you want GROUP BY, COUNT() and EXISTS()

declare @t table(entry_id int, cat_id int)

insert @t select 1, 1
insert @t select 2, 1
insert @t select 1, 2
insert @t select 2, 2
insert @t select 3, 1
insert @t select 1, 20

select t1.cat_id, COUNT(*)
from @t as t1
where exists(
    select * from @t
    where t1.entry_id = entry_id 
    and cat_id = 20)
group by t1.cat_id

V2 using join instead of EXISTS()

declare @t table(entry_id int, cat_id int)

insert @t select 1, 1
insert @t select 2, 1
insert @t select 1, 2
insert @t select 2, 2
insert @t select 3, 1
insert @t select 1, 20

select t1.cat_id, COUNT(*)
from @t as t1
join @t as t2 on t1.entry_id = t2.entry_id and t2.cat_id = 20
group by t1.cat_id
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Would this not just give the total number of entries in each category though? I need to specifically constrain the COUNT on two sets of input category ids. I'm interested to know if your solution could be expanded to do this though... hmm. –  Oskar Smith Mar 17 '12 at 15:50
    
Answer updated. –  Chris Gessler Mar 17 '12 at 16:18
    
Thank you, V2 above is very nice and fast. Excellent work! –  Oskar Smith Mar 17 '12 at 16:59
    
@OskarSmith - Your welcome. Glad I could help. –  Chris Gessler Mar 17 '12 at 17:12
select count(distinct entry_id) from myTable where cat_id=20 and entry_id in 
(select distinct entry_id from myTable where cat_id in (1,2,3));
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this would work, many thanks. Still interested to see if there is any way of doing it without a subquery though, but it's not the end of the world if I do need to use one I guess. –  Oskar Smith Mar 17 '12 at 15:48

With no subqueries, using JOIN and GROUP BY:

Join the table to itself using entry_id (this gives you all possible pairs of cat_id for that entry_id). Select rows having cat_id both a member of (1,2,3) and the second cat_id = 20.

SELECT r1.entry_id
FROM records r1
JOIN records r2  USING(entry_id)
WHERE r1.cat_id IN (1,2,3)
  AND r2.cat_id = 20 GROUP BY entry_id;
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