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I have a Javascript bookmarklet that POSTs to a PHP script, and I need PHP to know the filename of the page that the bookmarklet is POSTing from. I'll be using that filename with file_put_contents(), so I need it to be a real file.

The PHP will also be running on the same server as the page being POSTed from.

For example:

  • script.php is placed in the root of an arbitrary server (http://site.com/)
  • The operator browses to an arbitrary page on the server (http://site.com/foo/bar/baz) before executing the bookmarklet.
  • The bookmarklet sends some data to http://site.com/script.php.
  • script.php now needs to make some modifications to the file corresponding to http://site.com/foo/bar/baz, but can't resolve the URL to a filename.

There's location.href in Javascript and $_SERVER[ 'HTTP_REFERER' ] in PHP, but in the case of a rewritten URL (via mod_rewrite or whatever) these won't contain the real filename.

Is there any way to find the real filename of a URL in PHP or Javascript?

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__FILE__ will give you the full path to the current file. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 17 '12 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's location.href in Javascript and $_SERVER[ 'HTTP_REFERER' ] in PHP, but in the case of a rewritten URL (via mod_rewrite or whatever) these won't contain the real filename.

Is there any way to find the real filename of a URL in PHP or Javascript?

In Javascript: Client side Javascript has no idea about server side code unless the server passes that information to the client. Short answer: not unless you make it possible.

In PHP: I think that realpath will translate a URL to a physical file on the local drive (in ASP it is Server.MapPath), BUT, I don't know if that will work for rewritten URLs. I very much doubt it. If I am correct that it will not, then there could possibly be a related function specific to whatever framework you are using, if one is being used. If you are simply using mod_rewrite or similar without a framework, then you would have to code up your own function which knows how to translate from the virtual path to a real one.

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After looking into this more today, I think a generic solution may not exist (realpath() only resolves filesystem links, as you say). I'll probably implement some kind of URL conversion for specific setups, as per this answer. –  cltatman Mar 18 '12 at 22:02

You can't use $_SERVER["HTTP_REFERER"] because the client may choose not to send it, and this seems to be an essential bit of data.

In JavaScript you can only know the URL as it is displayed to the user (via document.location.href). If you want to know the filepath of the php script that handles that URL, just have PHP output the filepath somewhere on the page (in JS source) so JS can pick it up and pass it on.

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Thanks Frits, but modifying each page to output its filename isn't really feasible, I'll add a use case to my original question, hopefully that will clarify. :) –  cltatman Mar 17 '12 at 15:47
1  
"So it needs to be a real filename", the client can send anything! This is not a safe way to program, you need to rethink what you're doing. –  Halcyon Mar 17 '12 at 15:52
    
This isn't really on-topic, but it's a developer tool protected with a passcode. Still, if there's a way to accomplish this without $_SERVER[ 'HTTP_REFERER' ], I'm all for it. –  cltatman Mar 17 '12 at 16:04

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