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Now that it's answered: Don't bother reading this question, it's a bit lengthy and probably not worth your time. There were bugs in my code, and that was the reason why the move constructor wasn't called. Check the answers for details. Keep in mind that RVO and NRVO (Named Return Value Optimization) might account for the calls not happening as you expect.


I expect the move ctor to be called for this line, but the copy ctor is called instead:

Ding d3 = d1 + d2;

The Ding class has a user-defined move ctor and on operator+ overload. The reason I expect the move ctor to be called is that the operator+ returns a temporary object, an rvalue reference, so the move optimization could happen.

Everything I'm writing here might be wrong as I'm a C++ beginner. Here's the code:

// Copied and modified code from here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/3109981
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

struct Ding {
    char* data;

    Ding(const char* p) {
        std::cout << " ctor for: " << p << "\n";
        size_t size = strlen(p) + 1;
        data = new char[size];
        memcpy(data, p, size);
    }

    ~Ding() {
        std::cout << " dtor for: " << data << "\n";
        delete[] data;
    }

    Ding(const Ding& that) {
        std::cout << " copy for: " << that.data << "\n";
        size_t size = strlen(that.data) + 1;
        data = new char[size];
        memcpy(data, that.data, size);
    }

    Ding(Ding&& that) {
        std::cout << " MOVE for: " << that.data << "\n";
        data = that.data;
        that.data = nullptr;
    }

    Ding& operator=(Ding that) {
        std::cout << " assignment: " << that.data << "\n";
        std::swap(data, that.data);
        return *this;
    }

    Ding& operator+(const Ding that) const {
        std::cout << " plus for: " << that.data << "\n";
        size_t len_this = strlen(this->data);
        size_t len_that = strlen(that.data);
        char * tmp = new char[len_this + len_that + 1];
        memcpy( tmp,          this->data, len_this);
        memcpy(&tmp[len_this], that.data, len_that + 1);
        Ding * neu = new Ding(tmp);
        return *neu;
    }
};

void print(Ding d) {
    std::cout << "  (print): " << d.data << std::endl;
}

int main(void) {
    std::cout << "putting a Ding on the stack\n";
    Ding d1("jajaja");
    std::cout << "calling print routine\n";
    print(d1);
    std::cout << "putting a second Ding on the stack\n";
    Ding d2("nein");
//  std::cout << "calling print routine\n";
//  print(d2);
    std::cout << "Putting a third Ding on the stack, init from + op ...\n";
    std::cout << "... so expecting so see MOVE ctor used ...\n";
    Ding d3 = d1 + d2;
//  std::cout << "calling print routine\n";
//  print(d3);
    std::cout << "End of main, dtors being called ...\n";
}

The compiler invocations (on Win7) for VC2010 Express and MinGW (GCC 4.6) are as follows:

cl /nologo /W4 /EHsc /MD move-sem.cpp
g++ -std=c++0x move-sem.cpp -o move-gcc.exe

Both binaries produce the same output (sans order of destruction at end of program):

putting a Ding on the stack
 ctor for: jajaja
calling print routine
 copy for: jajaja
  (print): jajaja
 dtor for: jajaja
putting a second Ding on the stack
 ctor for: nein
Putting a third Ding on the stack, init from + op ...
... so expecting so see MOVE ctor used ...
 copy for: nein
 plus for: nein
 ctor for: jajajanein
 dtor for: nein
 copy for: jajajanein
End of main, dtors being called ...
 dtor for: jajajanein
 dtor for: nein
 dtor for: jajaja

To recall what the question was after this long text: Why isn't the move constructor called for Ding d3 = d1 + d2;?

I'm aware that there are other questions as to why move ctors aren't getting called but I cannot map their answers to this case.

Update

I changed the program as follows as per David Rodriguez' comments:

--- move-sem.cpp.orig   2012-03-17 17:00:56.901570900 +0100
+++ move-sem.cpp        2012-03-17 17:01:14.016549800 +0100
@@ -36,15 +36,14 @@
                return *this;
        }

-       Ding& operator+(const Ding that) const {
+       Ding operator+(const Ding that) const {
                std::cout << " plus for: " << that.data << "\n";
                size_t len_this = strlen(this->data);
                size_t len_that = strlen(that.data);
                char * tmp = new char[len_this + len_that + 1];
                memcpy( tmp,          this->data, len_this);
                memcpy(&tmp[len_this], that.data, len_that + 1);
-               Ding * neu = new Ding(tmp);
-               return *neu;
+               return tmp;
        }
 };

I then recompiled the program using the compiler invocations mentioned above and got an output where one copy (copy for: jajajanein) was removed. I then tried the following line:

g++ -std=c++0x -fno-elide-constructors move-sem.cpp -o move-gcc.exe

And tata! Now I'm seeing the move ctor at work! ... But I think there's another error now, the output of that new move-gcc.exe doesn't list the dtor invocations any more:

putting a Ding on the stack
 ctor for: jajaja
calling print routine
 copy for: jajaja
  (print): jajaja
 dtor for: jajaja
putting a second Ding on the stack
 ctor for: nein
Putting a third Ding on the stack, init from + op ...
... so expecting so see MOVE ctor used ...
 copy for: nein
 plus for: nein
 ctor for: jajajanein
 MOVE for: jajajanein
 dtor for:

Second Update

I replaced the bad operator+ with the following (possibly equally bad) code:

Ding& operator+=(const Ding & rhs) {
    std::cout << " op+= for: " << data << " and " << rhs.data << "\n";
    size_t len_this = strlen(this->data);
    size_t len_that = strlen(rhs.data);
    char * buf = new char[len_this + len_that + 1];
    memcpy( buf,         this->data, len_this);
    memcpy(&buf[len_this], rhs.data, len_that + 1);
    delete[] data;
    data = buf;
    return *this;
}

Ding operator+(const Ding & rhs) const {
    Ding temp(*this);
    temp += rhs;
    return temp;
}

I also removed the following line from the destructor, and it stopped the program from terminating abnormally:

std::cout << " dtor for: " << data << "\n";

The move constructor is now being called when compiling with MSVC and with g++ -std=c++0x -fno-elide-constructors.

share|improve this question
    
For operator+ to be returning a temporary it would need to return a Ding, not a Ding&. –  Vaughn Cato Mar 17 '12 at 16:06
    
I recommend that you start learning one bit at a time. First start with calling conventions, create a class that will log the operations and then see how different function signatures work (you should not have any new there, if you want strings, use std::string) Once you have that clear and understand them, read on operator overloading and the recommended ways. Finally once you are comfortable with that, consider managing your own resources (you can even skip this part, in most cases you don't want to manage resources). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 17 '12 at 17:31
    
Another thing is that you should not edit the question with different questions, as the answers will no longer make sense. Now as of the edit, consider what happens when the destructor of an object that has been moved from is called. After moving, the object should still be destructible. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 17 '12 at 17:34
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas, thanks for your help and sound advice. - The errors during destruction occurred because in the dtor I tried to output the data member when I had (correctly, I believe) set to nullptr in the move ctor. So the fix was to check (nullptr == data ? "NULL" : data) before accessing the memory. I think the object was in an okay state for destruction, just the destructor was bad. –  Lumi Mar 17 '12 at 21:29
    
@Lumi, that much I realized. That was the reason for the comment. If you want a similar tracing output you can print cout << (void*)data which will indicate if it is null or else do: cout << (data?data:"(null)" to have the destructor print "(null)" if the pointer is not set rather than crash. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 17 '12 at 23:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
    Ding * neu = new Ding(tmp);
    return *neu;

This is wrong. You are dynamically allocating a Ding and then forcing a copy of it. Because the Ding is dynamically allocated, you are leaking it, it's lifetime extends beyond the return statement and the compiler cannot move from it. Note that you are not returning a temporary.

Change that to:

    return Ding(tmp);

Or even:

    return tmp;

As your constructor taking a const char* is not explicit, the compiler will use it to create a new Ding object. In both cases, the lifetime of the temporary does not extend beyond the return statement and the compiler will move.

(This answer assumes that you understand that the copy from the returned object to the d3 has been elided, if that is where you expected the move, then the compiler did something better: avoid the operation altogether).

EDIT As DeadMG has written a canonical form but it includes errors I will follow up on that:

There is much to say about operator overloading, but a common recommendation (the one I give and follow) is to implement operatorX= as a member function (it is an operation applied to the left hand side) and then implement operator+ as a free function in terms of the former. In C++11 that would be:

class X {
   X& operator+=( X const & ); // we do not modify the rhs internally
};
X operator+( X lhs, X const & rhs ) {
  lhs += rhs;                  // reuse implementation
  return lhs;
}

Some things to note: operator+ is symmetric with respect to types as it is a free function. All implicit conversions that can happen on the right hand side are also available in the lhs. In your particular case, Ding is implicitly convertible from const char*, which means that by having a free function operator+ you can write:

Ding d( "A" );
const char* str = "B";
d + d;     // no conversions
d + str;   // conversion on the right hand side
str + d;   // conversion on the left hand side

By defining operator+= as a public member function you need to write a single implementation and that implementation can be reused, so you get two operators for the cost of one (and three extra lines of code that are trivial).

Argument by value and return by value. This enables the compiler to elide the copy to the parameter if the argument is a temporary. As there is a move constructor, there will not be any internal copy either, the argument will be modified and moved to the return object. (This second copy cannot be elided).

I wrote a bit more than this on operator overloading here some time ago... It does not explicitly deal with optimizations (moving) but there are other posts there that deal with the C++03 version of it. From that to C++11 features you should be able to fill in the blanks.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I presumed some elision might be going on since I had read about it in another post here. I do see my move ctor at work when compiling with g++ -std=c++0x -fno-elide-constructors as above. But now some of the output is missing and the program terminates abnormally, so there are more bugs in my program. –  Lumi Mar 17 '12 at 16:51
    
I assumed that he needed a member operator because he had written one. Admittedly, I did not consider the need for a free operator. –  Puppy Mar 17 '12 at 19:06
    
@David, your blog post about implementing the operator+ as a free function makes sense to me. Good comments. I appreciate your help, as those of the others. –  Lumi Mar 17 '12 at 21:40

There is nothing to be moved.

You cannot move from d1 or d2, because that would destroy them. And you cannot move the return value of the operator+, because that is a reference.

share|improve this answer

You have not written a correct addition operator. The canonical form is

Ding operator+(Ding other) const {
    other += this;
    return other; 
    // return std::move(other) if you're on MSVC 
    // which sometimes doesn't do this properly
}
Ding& operator+=(const Ding& other);

Your code exhibits many problems, like memory leaks, which also result from having bad operator overloads.

Also, do not forget the potential impacts of RVO and NRVO on the expected output.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Good lesson for me. Back to the books, I guess, learn operator overloading before move constructors. –  Lumi Mar 17 '12 at 16:46
    
Iterestingly your canonical form is wrong :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 17 '12 at 16:53
    
Added return statement to complete the operator+ implementation. –  André Caron Mar 17 '12 at 17:12
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: What would you use? T operator+(T a, const T& b) { return a += b; }, perhaps? –  Jon Purdy Mar 17 '12 at 17:37
    
@JonPurdy: Yes, that allows the compiler to elide unnecessary copies in cases like a + b + c. As it is in this answer, the result of a + b is bound by a reference and then manually copied. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 17 '12 at 17:45

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