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The following is a C++ program using STL vector container. Just wanted to know why the display() function is not printing the vector contents to the screen. If displaying the size() line is commented out, display() function works fine.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

void display(vector<int> &v)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++)
    {
        cout << v[i] << " ";
    }
    cout << "\n" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    vector<int> v;
    cout << "Size of Vector=" << v.size() << endl;

    //Putting values into the vector
    int x;
    cout << "Enter five integer values" << endl;
    for(int i; i<5; i++)
    {
        cin >> x;
        v.push_back(x);
    }
    //Size after adding values
    cout << "Size of Vector=" << v.size() << endl;

    //Display the contents of vector
    display(v);

    v.push_back(6);

    //Size after adding values
    cout << "Size of Vector=" << v.size() << endl;

    //Display the contents of vector
    display(v);

}

Output:

Size of Vector=0

Enter five integer values

1

2

3

4

5

Size of Vector=5


Size of Vector=6
share|improve this question
6  
initialize your variables! int i = 0 –  Mr E Mar 17 '12 at 17:06
1  
When you iterated through your vector to display, you clearly wanted to stop at the end. But where did you want to start? :) (P.S. enabling all warnings in your compiler might have caught this mistake for you) –  Hurkyl Mar 17 '12 at 17:08
1  
You should really initialize your iterator variables ala int i=0; It is very dangerous to just assume that C++ has done you a favor and initialized them to 0. –  Josh Mar 17 '12 at 17:08
    
Did you debug the code using any debugger ? Looks like SO is slowly becoming a place where we want others to debug our code. –  Jagannath Mar 19 '12 at 3:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

There is an idiomatic way for printing a vector out.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

//note the const
void display_vector(const vector<int> &v)
{
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(),
        std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}

This way is safe and doesn't require you to keep track of the vectors size or anything like that. It is also easily recognisable to other C++ developers.

This method works on other container types too that do not allow random access.

std::list<int> l;
//use l

std::copy(l.begin(), l.end(),
          std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));

This works both ways with input too consider the following:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::cout << "Enter int end with q" << std::endl;
    std::vector<int> v; //a deque is probably better TBH
    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<int>(std::cin),
              std::istream_iterator<int>(),
              std::back_inserter<int>(v));

    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(),
              std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}

This version doesn't require any hard coding of size or manual management of the actual elements.

share|improve this answer
    
Use "\n" as the second parameter for ostream_iterator to add a newline to your output. –  Mihai Nov 12 '13 at 6:47

You are not initializing your variables. for(int i = 0; not for(int i;

share|improve this answer
3  
Downvoted? Why? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 17 '12 at 17:26

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