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I'm trying to expand a div. However everything works accept the 'height' property. I use jQuery's addClass function to add this class;

.expandHighlight
{
   height:300px;
   border-color:rgba(48,110,158,.75)!important;
   box-shadow:0 0 5px 2px rgba(48,110,158,.5);
}

using the jQuery function;

$('#expand').click(function()
   {
    $('#buttonField').css('visibility','hidden');
    $('#expand').addClass("expandHighlight");
   });

And the div im trying to expand has the css;

#expand
{
   background-color:#F9F9F9;border-radius:3px;
   border:1px solid #C0C0C0;
   width:500px;
   height:66px;
   border-radius:2px;
}
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ID-selectors have to be prefixed by a sharp: #expand. –  Rob W Mar 17 '12 at 17:24
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you add the class, you then have two CSS rules that pertain to the same object for height. That means the the CSS specificity rules will determine which CSS rule applies.

In this case, the #expand rule has more specificity than the .expandHighlight rule so it wins.

You can fix this by adding more specificity to the .expandHighlight rule like this:

#expand.expandHighlight {
   height:300px;
   border-color:rgba(48,110,158,.75)!important;
   box-shadow:0 0 5px 2px rgba(48,110,158,.5);
}

And, then it will have more specificity and will win when the expandHighlight class is assigned.

You can read more about CSS specificity and how it works here.


You could also fix it by making both of the rules be only a class and putting the expandHighlight rule after the regular height rule like this:

<div id="expand" class="expandNormal"></div>

.expandNormal {
    height: 500px;
    border:1px solid #C0C0C0;
    width:500px;
}

.expandHighlight {
   height:300px;
   border-color:rgba(48,110,158,.75)!important;
   box-shadow:0 0 5px 2px rgba(48,110,158,.5);
}

You would of course add class="expandNormal" to the #expand object so it would get the default rule which would then be override by the expandHighlight rule only when that class was also present.

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Thank you so much! It worked out. And you made me learn a vital rule in CSS. Thanks a lot! –  Ali Mar 17 '12 at 17:26
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The #id selector has more specificity than the .class selector.

You could change the .class selector have more specificity.

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The problem stands if the content inside the div is smaller than the height itself. You have to use min-height instead of normal height so the class will be like this:

.expandHighlight {
    min-height:300px;
    ....
}

Here is a demo of working code: http://jsfiddle.net/Ajjd4/

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