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I'm trying to convert a string I read with this code to binary and hexa.

READ_STRING:
    MOV DX, offset buffer
    MOV AH, 0Ah
    INT 21h
    MOV SI, 1d
    MOV AX, 0
    XOR CX, CX
    MOV CL, buffer[SI]
    INC SI

LOOP_1:
    MOV DX, 10
    MUL DX
    MOV DL, buffer[SI]
    SUB DL, 30h
    MOV DH, 0
    ADD AX, DX
    INC SI
    LOOP LOOP_1

    RET

So far I have this code for binary output but it always prints "1001" (9 in decimal):

NEXT:

    XOR AX, AX
    XOR BX, BX
    XOR CX, CX
    MOV CL, 2
    MOV AL, byte ptr[nombre]
    MOV DI, offset binaire

; DIV : divide AX by CL. Remainder in AH and result in AL

LOOP:
    DIV CL ; remainder in AH, quotient in AL
    ADD AH, '0' ;  0 -> '0' , 1 -> '1'
    MOV [DI], AH ; Saves the remainder in the array
    INC DI
    MOV AH, 0 ; reset AH for next division
    CMP AL, 0 ; if result is 0, end
    JNE LOOP

;Prints the binary number               
    MOV DX, offset binaire
    CALL WRITE_STRING

Thanks! If you need anything else just ask.

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1  
Don't try and write a complex algorithm directly in assembler. Develop the algorithm in a high-level language first, and then translate it. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 17 '12 at 18:29
    
... or have the compiler translate it for you. –  Carl Norum Mar 17 '12 at 18:35
    
And if you're going to learn assembler, don't learn 8086. 80x86, MIPS, ARM - anything but 16-bit DOS 808x ;). Good reference, if you're interested: savannah.nongnu.org/projects/pgubook –  paulsm4 Mar 17 '12 at 18:36
    
@Carl How would I do that? And would it be compatible with MASM? –  Madx23 Mar 17 '12 at 18:38
    
Get a 16-bit DOS compiler I guess - and usually you'll need to massage the disassembler's output a bit to make it work with your assembler, but it's usually not terrible. –  Carl Norum Mar 17 '12 at 18:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Before worrying about whether or not you can display the value as binary or hexadecimal; check to make sure your code correctly converts the user's input into an integer (e.g. with a debugger).

For binary, consider something like this:

    mov bx,ax              ;bx = the value to display as binary
    mov cx,16              ;cx = number of bits to display
    mov di,offset binaire  ;es:di = address to store string

.nextBit:
    xor ax,ax              ;al = 0
    add bx,bx              ;bx = value * 2; carry flag = overflow
    adc al,0               ;al = '0' or '1'
    stosb                  ;Add new character to string
    loop .nextBit
    mov byte [di],0        ;Terminate the string (ASCIIZ?)

    mov dx, offset binaire
    call WRITE_STRING

For hexadecimal, it's the same basic idea, except you need to extract the highest 4 bits:

    mov bx,ax              ;bx = the value to display as binary
    mov cx,4               ;cx = number of nibbles to display
    mov di,offset binaire  ;es:di = address to store string

.nextNibble:
    mov ax,bx              ;ax = value
    shr ax,12              ;ax = highest 4 bits of value
    shl bx,4               ;bx = value << 4
    add al,'0'
    cmp al,'9'
    jbe .gotChar
    add al,'A' - '9'
.gotChar:
    stosb                  ;Add new character to string
    loop .nextBit
    mov byte [di],0        ;Terminate the string (ASCIIZ?)

    mov dx, offset binaire
    call WRITE_STRING

Note 1: I haven't tested any of the code above, and I normally use NASM (not MASM), so it may not assemble "as is".

Note 2: Example code above is intentionally simple. For performance you could do a lot better using lookup tables instead.

Note 3: These aren't complex algorithms and you shouldn't need to mess about with high level languages first (unless you don't understand the theory/maths behind binary/hex conversion perhaps). Also, an algorithm that seems elegant in one language can be an ugly mess in another language (e.g. you can't detect overflow in an easy/clean way in C, so the method used for binary conversion above wouldn't be obvious or elegant in C; and a different method that is elegant in C might suck badly in assembly).

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